EMT weight lift requirements

meusveritas

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I am a female EMT and am concerned about the lifting. I truly thought I had this but I recently did my lift test and fell 50 lbs short of my final lift. I am petite but don't want to be a burden and not able to adequately do the job. I have hired a personal trainer and am on a high protein, low fat diet. I'm 5'6 and 120lbs. I need to lift 140lbs. I can currently do 90lbs. I have 6 weeks to be able to lift 50lbs more than what I currently can. Also I have to lift it to a mark on the wall that is based on average EMT height, so I have to get on my toes and hike the weight up to my shoulders when the taller EMT's can have it about waist high. I want this. I want to be good at my job. Are there any encouraging words or anyone who has been through this? I'm going hard for it, just need to know it is possible.
 

STXmedic

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What kind of lift test are you doing?!
 

Arovetli

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there are many slender females, and males, that work in EMS.

lifting is more a function of how you lift than of pure strength, so be sure you have the proper mechanics down pat.

standing on tip toes sounds concerning.
 
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Aidey

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My mind turned off at "low fat". Fire your trainer and go to your nearest crossfit gym, and look up the zone diet. Low fat will do nothing but make you feel like crap. You're trying to get stronger and build muscle, you need to eat like it.
 

chaz90

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Also I have to lift it to a mark on the wall that is based on average EMT height, so I have to get on my toes and hike the weight up to my shoulders when the taller EMT's can have it about waist high.
So you're telling us the height difference looks like this?


In all seriousness though, best of luck. As was mentioned, technique can be a huge part of it. If you have to increase your max to shoulder height in only 6 weeks it will be a struggle, but hopefully still manageable.
 

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meusveritas

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Thanks

Thanks for the advice. I am eating a lot of protein and will make sure I am eating enough to stay healthy and gain the muscle. I have to be able to dead lift 140lbs and lift that up to a line on the wall which for me, I must go on my toes to reach. Also, I have to dead lift 120lbs and walk up and down a flight of stairs. These are the two things I failed on my first lift test.
 

Aidey

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A lot of protein isn't only what you need. You need a well rounded diet, especially if you are working out several times a week. That means carbs and fat too, not just "a lot of protein".

What exactly is your trainer having you do?
 
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meusveritas

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Training

They have me lifting weights and doing cardio 6 days a week, alternating bench press, leg press, rowing, lunges and curls. I have been referred to protein shakes and to avoid high fat foods. I already eat mostly vegetarian and am not overweight. Just small with little muscle obviously LOL. I start the program tomorrow. The work out program was given to me by the ambulance service, NOT by my trainer. He and I still have to meet and hash it out.
 

Aidey

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If your trainer doesn't have you actually doing dead lifts, then immediately fire him and go to your nearest crossfit gym or find a trainer who will do dead lifts. I'm 100% serious about this. You also need to talk to someone who knows about nutrition. Fat is an essential nutrient, and like I said before, you need to have a balanced diet if you want to get anywhere.
 

bonesaw

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Don't screw around with trainers....most of them are useless. Read some info off of here..

http://forums.sherdog.com/forums/f13/

Post your question on there and you will have respected strength competitors and coaches respond.

(deadlifts are great, but don't forget about squats, cleans etc..)
 
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J B

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I'm not a physical trainer, but I would think that if you need to be good at deadlifting and walking up/down stairs.... That deadlifting and walking up/down stairs should be part of your workout.
 

Remi

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I am a female EMT and am concerned about the lifting. I truly thought I had this but I recently did my lift test and fell 50 lbs short of my final lift. I am petite but don't want to be a burden and not able to adequately do the job. I have hired a personal trainer and am on a high protein, low fat diet. I'm 5'6 and 120lbs. I need to lift 140lbs. I can currently do 90lbs. I have 6 weeks to be able to lift 50lbs more than what I currently can. Also I have to lift it to a mark on the wall that is based on average EMT height, so I have to get on my toes and hike the weight up to my shoulders when the taller EMT's can have it about waist high. I want this. I want to be good at my job. Are there any encouraging words or anyone who has been through this? I'm going hard for it, just need to know it is possible.
You can probably improve by 50# by practicing technique alone. This is critically important anyway, as someone of your build is very susceptible to low back injuries, which are common anyway in EMS.

I second the advice to find someone to teach you to do deadlifts.

Here is what I would do:

  • Find someone who knows what they are doing to teach you how to do dead lifts correctly. They aren't technically difficult at all, so you can learn them in just a few minutes. It's important that you do them right, though.


  • Skip the cardio completely for now. You are trying to gain strength quickly and lots of cardio will impede that.


  • 3 or 4 times a week spend some time practicing specifically what you will be tested on. Start with, say, 75# to start, and add some weight every week. Maintaining a focus on maintaining your sacral arch and keeping your abs tight as you lift.


  • 2 times a week, after you've done that practice, do a heavy set of dead lifts.
 

mcdonl

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Oly Lifts....

Deadlifts, squats, cleans/presses, jump squats, High Pulls, etc... These are all good execises for functional strength requirements such as EMS/Fire.

These will all give you what you are searching for. Just do it right. I assume you are young, so recovery should not be a problem but be sure to consider it.
 

MagicTyler

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What kind of test is this? The only lifting test I've ever seen used is to lift a gurney into an ambulance or to highest locking height with a partner.

I'm a short guy, 5'7" and our ambulance is really high with no air bag suspension, I've never had to be on my tippy toes to lift a patient in.

This test seems flawed to me.
 
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meusveritas

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Flawed

I have had a lot of people say the test seems flawed. I got a hold of some of the other females with this particular company to ask how they did it and the max weight on their test was only 120lbs. So I'm not sure why 140 is required of me for the same position and they only tested a couple weeks ago. Still trying to figure this out and just hoping it is possible. It's made me feel like I would be a liability in the field (my worst nightmare) and the guy who gave the test was pretty condescending. Starting my weight training nonetheless and doing my research. I have to lift 140 to my chin from the floor and carry 120 up and down a flight of stair 3 times. I am going to incorporate these exercises in my workout so as to be prepared. But have to start with 90 as that is my max lift for now.
 

LEB343

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It sounds like you need to work on your technique. I'm 5'2" and 120 lbs and I am in no way in shape. I had a pretty tough lifting test that sounds similar to your (except it was 120 lbs for females) and I passed. I have a background in physical therapy/ athletic training and I know how to lift. There are many girls smaller than you, and me, in the field that can lift.
 

Handsome Robb

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I have an issue with the way this topic is going.

I'm going to preface this post with the fact that my current and last two partners before this one have been female, I prefer to work with a female. It adds a good dynamic to the crew.

With that said, we're doing the same job, it's asinine to hold someone to a lower standard because they're a woman.

I understand why you're frustrated and that is messed up that they changed it on you but such is life.

I promise the majority of your patients will weigh more than 140 lbs.

Like I said, I'm not trying to be demeaning or rude but this is something that irks me. If we're tasked with the same job then we should be held to the same standard whether you're male, female, both, red, blue, orange, green, brown, yellow, white, teal, magenta, black or however else you want to break things down.
 
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meusveritas

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Thnx

I have never thought for a minute I should be held to different standards. I simply asked for advice on how to reach this goal, not to find a way around it. I'm not sure why you thought this thread was going in that direction. I've committed to a personal trainer and have other female EMT's who have accomplished this coaching me. So....yeah. Not looking for any special treatment here, but I knew that by posting some would freak out and think I was. I understand I have to lift the same as any EMT's, whether male or female. Was just asking for advice and support. LOL
 

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