EMT-P to PA-C

xswatmedic

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Hello, I am new to your forum. I signed up because I want to be certain to "never forget where I came from." I am a former EMT-P, currently working as a PA-C (Physician Assistant). I wanted to ask how many of you out there have gone this route, know someone who has gone this route, or would like to make the transition yourself.

My motives are these: EMT-P's are not now, nor have we ever been paid what we are worth. Most of us do it just for the love of the work (I am about to go on as a reserve in the area I live, just because I miss it!). I have seen countless medics go into nursing or leave medicine all together. My humble opinion is simply; if you are a good medic, love medicine (not nursing, but medicine) then you should consider PA-C. It is a NATURAL transition from EMT-P. The thing I miss the most about my work as an EMT-P are the men and women I worked with. Keeping that in mind, I hope to use this forum to help anyone who would like to make the transition and/or communicate with those of you who are experienced with the transition.

Hope this is the right spot for this post.

Be Safe,

Joe Hamilton, EMT-P, PA-C
 

firecoins

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yes. I agree being a PA-C is a good progression.
 

Ridryder911

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I had went into a PA program at one one time and decided not to continue. I personally felt it was to confining and limited. Nothing personally wrong with PA's, but for personal reasons rather have the ability to practice and bill on my own license, if I so do choose to. I am now in a nurse practitioner program, which allows me to specialize.

Good luck in your continuation of your program.

R/r 911
 
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xswatmedic

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Good for you, R/r. Practice in California (I haven't practiced in other states) is certainly not restricted for PA'S as "dependant practitioners." I trained at Stanford School of Medicine, a program that has the good sense to accept primarily RN's and medics. My RN peers were able to apply for NP as well as PA once they finished, great program! The only "down side" is there was no degree issued, however we more than made up for that with 1700+ hours of clinical time and finished in 15-16 months.

Good luck with your NP program, given your background (EMS) you will do great!

Joe Hamilton, EMT-P, PA-C
 

firecoins

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At what point is it simply best to go to med school?
 

fm_emt

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"dependant practitioners." I trained at Stanford School of Medicine, a program that has the good sense to accept primarily RN's and medics. My RN
Hrm, where are you now?

Stanford is expanding the med school quite a bit.
 
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xswatmedic

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Hrm, where are you now?

Stanford is expanding the med school quite a bit.
I am in Central Cal. (Bakersfield). I came here to pay back my NHSC Scholarship and decided to stay. I lived in Sunnyvale when I was up there! How are things? Do you work for AMR or the city?
 

Luno

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xswatmedic, did you work in sunnyvale? I had a friend who was a medic there, worked for the city, he's now moved on to "other" things...
 

BossyCow

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Guardian

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Hello, I am new to your forum. I signed up because I want to be certain to "never forget where I came from." I am a former EMT-P, currently working as a PA-C (Physician Assistant). I wanted to ask how many of you out there have gone this route, know someone who has gone this route, or would like to make the transition yourself.

My motives are these: EMT-P's are not now, nor have we ever been paid what we are worth. Most of us do it just for the love of the work (I am about to go on as a reserve in the area I live, just because I miss it!). I have seen countless medics go into nursing or leave medicine all together. My humble opinion is simply; if you are a good medic, love medicine (not nursing, but medicine) then you should consider PA-C. It is a NATURAL transition from EMT-P. The thing I miss the most about my work as an EMT-P are the men and women I worked with. Keeping that in mind, I hope to use this forum to help anyone who would like to make the transition and/or communicate with those of you who are experienced with the transition.

Hope this is the right spot for this post.

Be Safe,

Joe Hamilton, EMT-P, PA-C

Nice of you to join, I hope you stick around and give us insight from time to time. I've seriously considered PA or MD school. It's interesting that you call it a natural transition given how different the two are. I think many paramedics would love to go onto PA school. I also think the majority of paramedics wouldn't have a chance at getting in PA school because of the education and scientific background needed. Realistically, to most, it's not even an option. Also, it seems PA and med schools frown upon non-traditional applicants and thus, automatically weed out most paramedic applicants which is sad. What was your background, college major, and how did you beat the odds?
 
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Glorified

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I am an infant to EMS and health care in general. I am young now, and look forward to the excitement that EMS offers. I'm just gonna see what happens. Anyways, I have heard of PA's but what does the "C" stand for? My Instructor also talked about our school trying to develop a Paramedic to PA bridge program, and it would only take an additional year to become a PA. She caled it "the wave of the future." I am just trying to focus on the present righ now, because I think about the future so much I distract myself from my tasks at hand (becoming a great EMT).
 
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Guardian

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physician assistant certified. please note, you could have found this with a google search in under a minute.

wave of the future? maybe but right now, they are white collar professionals that rake in money and we are working stiffs. Most PA's have master's degrees nowadays and require a bach to even apply to PA school. A year from paramedic to PA, maybe in 20 years, maybe, then again with all the baby boomers, who knows but I wouldn't bet on it.
 

Guardian

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Now, there has been talk for years about paramedics, especially in rural areas, taking on more responsibilities and acting in some cases similarly to PAs. But bridge to PA, I don't think so.
 

akflightmedic

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There already is a bridge program and has been in effect for seveal years.

Google the Medex program out of WA.

I have two medic buddies that went through it and they are now both successful PAs.
 

Ridryder911

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Many of the bridge programs are under fire, not because of their lack of success or products of what they turned out; but because they are not master degree prepared programs.

There was one I attended that consequently changed because of this, that the national accreditation is attempting to have all PA programs be at that the minimal level of being a graduate degree.

The same action is took place for nurse practitioner programs a few years ago, now all graduating NP's have to be at least graduate level, and by the year 2015 have a DNSc. This is for professional, political and reimbursement reasons.

Many are not aware too that the PA has to have CEU's and re-take the board test every 6 years (and we thought, EMT re-cert was bad). This may not seem to bad, but figure the individual whom works with a dermatologist, now has to review OB, ped.'s, surgery, etc.. even though they may never work in it. But, the good point is they are thoroughly reviewed.

PA programs is one of the health professions that went form an associate degree level to a master degree format within a few short years. In some areas, it is much harder to enter the PA program than medical school itself. I know in my area it was the first master degree program and is part of the medical school, and they attend the same classes as med school students; however ironically if they return later to become a M.D. they have to retake those same classes. It will not count because it was not for physician level..

My advice is to check very carefully on all programs and the future of that profession. Be sure there is not hidden or further studies later one will have to acquire to be in that profession. PA is much needed and great profession.

R/r 911
 

firecoins

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I have been considering this program
http://www.hscbklyn.edu/pa/default.html

Its for a BS for a PA-C.

Since I am not a medic and already have a B.A. I am getting my science requirments at my community college. I may take the paramedic program first but am unsure Ill do that.
 
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Ridryder911

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Be very careful, many physicians and their associations (HMO's) prefer to have at least graduate degree PA and NP. I am in school with many already NP, that had to return back to get their graduate degree.

I have several friends that have their certificate and B.S. as a P.A-C. and as I described when competition is already there, why chance it ?

Remember, you are basically going through a fast pace medical school...

R/r 911
 

Ridryder911

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I have been considering this program
http://www.hscbklyn.edu/pa/default.html

Its for a BS for a PA-C.

Since I am not a medic and already have a B.A. I am getting my science requirments at my community college. I may take the paramedic program first but am unsure Ill do that.
If you have your B.A. already, why go for a B.S. ? Why not a M.S.? Most P.A. programs do not care if it is a B.A. or B.S. as long as you meet the entry requirements as all P.A. schools require. Then you can write your ticket anywhere.. As well, why are you taking community college level science in lieu of 300 and 400 level courses or even 500 or 600 level science courses. You should had met the general science level with a B.A.

R/r 911
 

firecoins

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If you have your B.A. already, why go for a B.S. ? Why not a M.S.? Most P.A. programs do not care if it is a B.A. or B.S. as long as you meet the entry requirements as all P.A. schools require. Then you can write your ticket anywhere.. As well, why are you taking community college level science in lieu of 300 and 400 level courses or even 500 or 600 level science courses. You should had met the general science level with a B.A.

R/r 911

I am 29. When I was in college, I was not going for a PA-C or pre med. I was an economics major. The science classes need for requirements were for non science majors. There was no need to take advanced science classes. The 2 science classes I did take dealt with physics and neurology. The community college I go to has the required science classed needed for most PA programs. Since both are SUNY the classes can be transferred.


Because the program I would like to do is run by a state school, it is alot cheaper than the private ones which award a master's. I am not really interested in the degree given as much as the cost of school.

You were right in the other thread at pointing out te medic wasn't needed. I wanted the medic but now I an unsure I want it.
 
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