EMT-IV class dress code

Blacke00

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So I started class last night, and we were told that they're instituting a dress code for the EMT-IV classes. They want us to start dressing like EMTs. I can definately understand for when we start doing clinicals and ride-alongs, but even when we're just sitting in the classroom we need em. OK, that's cool...

Anyway, now I need to find some pants and shirts. I'm leaning toward getting BDU-style pants, preferably fade-resistant, so they'll last a while.

The shirts can just be grey polos, but I also have to cover the tattoo on my forearm. I may have to go long sleeve, or wear something underneath. Anybody wear underarmor or anything like that? Or, what is your solution if have this problem?

Is there anybody in Knoxville, TN area that has a head's-up on where I can go in person? I've found a few that're probably good on Galls, Ebay, google shopping, etc, but would like to physically try them on if possible...

Are the sizes online fairly consistent with what you'd buy in the store, in your experience?

Any help/advice would be appreciated, thanks =)
 

Jon

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Do they want you to dress like EMT's... or like EMS professionals?

Because I know plenty of places where the "uniform" is a pair of ripped jeans and a ratty "I'm a band-aid whacker" T-shirt.

I often wear color-cordinated turtlenecks in the wintertime... espicially under a sweater. Sometimes they are underarmor... sometimes cotton.

They don't want you to wear shirts with their logo?
 

Blacke00

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I guess it would be "EMS professional".

I ended up going to a place called "Greene Military", that sells all the tactical stuff for Law Enforcement, and got a pair of black Rothco Ultra Force pants (they only had 1 of my size).

They said there'd been like 15 people in looking for EMS pants, where they normally only get maybe 15 a month.

As for shirts, it *has* to be grey polo-style, no t-shirts or anything like that.
 
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KEVD18

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i dont really believe in this sort of thing. during clinicals, sure a uniform is very appropriate. but when im in the classroom, i much prefer to be comfortable. what im wearing in the classroom is of noconsequence.

some will tell you that we need to improve the publics image of us. while i full agree with the, where is the public in the class room? it the instructor and the students. so that argument is crap.
 

Blacke00

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We were told last night that we also needed to get:

  1. Safety Glasses (have some)
  2. Flashlight (have one)
  3. Stethoscope (just got a cheap $16.50 set along with $6.00 set of shears...will get better stuff later)

At least the instructor was genuinely surprised that they didn't tell us all of this stuff before the class started...
 

Buzz

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i dont really believe in this sort of thing. during clinicals, sure a uniform is very appropriate. but when im in the classroom, i much prefer to be comfortable. what im wearing in the classroom is of noconsequence.

some will tell you that we need to improve the publics image of us. while i full agree with the, where is the public in the class room? it the instructor and the students. so that argument is crap.
When I did EMT-Basic, we had uniforms that we were to wear every day. We didn't get them until a month or two into the class, though. There was a notable change in the interaction between everyone when we were all wearing the same thing.
 

marineman

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Our medic class has uniforms. Dark blue shirt with a collar (polo) and dark pants or blue jeans with no holes or any of that crap. They say it's because paramedic is a professional class and dressing professional will help us maintain a professional attitude in class. The problem with our class uniform is that our ride along uniform is black pants, solid black boots, and a white shirt. Why not use the uniform for your ride along in class if you want uniforms.

On a personal note when I'm laying on my death bed with a massive MI it won't matter to me what the paramedic wore during class only that he's here and doing his best to help me now.
 

Ridryder911

EMS Guru
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On a personal note when I'm laying on my death bed with a massive MI it won't matter to me what the paramedic wore during class only that he's here and doing his best to help me now.

Maybe not in class, but what and how they present themselves in the field. This again is attempting to install professionalism. You are/were in military? Did you see the difference in they way recruits dressed off duty? Is there pants more pressed, shirts tucked in? I can tell when someone just leaves training.

As well, you may say that now, but who knows what you may feel like in 30-50 years? When you are not in the up of what is current and not. First appearance are the most lasting impressions, no matter what people say. Most do not know a sphygmonometer from a bed pan, their impressed you were able to take a blood pressure. So they base their opinions on what?...
Image and that alone. So yes, it is important.
 

Outbac1

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For my PCP class it was a light blue dress shirt with epulets, navy medic pants, black belt and boots. Hair had to be up off the collar(no exceptions), a max of one earing per ear and NO other visible piercings. No tongue, no lip, no eyebrow and definitely not the silver zit in the nose. Short haircuts for everyone were recommended as it was less for someone to get a grip with.

We were taught a lot about professionalism and a professional appearance. You only get one chance to make a first impression. And for some, especially the elderly it does matter.
 

KEVD18

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And for some, especially the elderly it does matter.
again, flawed logic. the elderly(or any member of the general public for that matter) arent in class with you. its the students and the teacher(s).

i cant speak for anybody else, but the way i act doesnt change with my clothing. i could go drinking with my buddies in uniform and id act the same as if i were in my streets. conversely, i could go to work in shorts and a van halen t-shirt and be just as professional as if i were suited and booted.

i agree that we have only one chance to make an impression on our patients. but i disagree that the attire you wear in a classroom changes the type of student you are.
 

LucidResq

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i agree that we have only one chance to make an impression on our patients. but i disagree that the attire you wear in a classroom changes the type of student you are.
I can see where you're coming from, but I think that the sooner you can start a good habit the better. It seems like for some reason it takes a while for many people to learn how to don a clean, professional uniform and if they can start learning to do so in the classroom they've got a head start. In my opinion it's better to have your EMT instructor saying "hey pull your pants up" than having your first boss having to tell you on the job.
 

John E

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hmmm...

You could tell who's taking the class seriously by how they carry themselves, how they dress, how they behave in the classroom.

Clothes make the man somebody wrote once. Can't help but wonder if it's so unimportant what one wears in class why do nursing students wear scrubs, why police/sheriff's cadets wear uniforms, why do soldiers wear uniforms, firefighters, medical students,RT's, mechanics in trade schools, etc, etc, etc.


John E
 

metivierm

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We had the option to wear uniforms for my class, but I choose to wear it for one simple reason:" your going to be working int he uniform, so why not train in it? it gets you sed to everything as well as making you feel more professional, and more serious in class.
 

Bosco578

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You could tell who's taking the class seriously by how they carry themselves, how they dress, how they behave in the classroom.

Clothes make the man somebody wrote once. Can't help but wonder if it's so unimportant what one wears in class why do nursing students wear scrubs, why police/sheriff's cadets wear uniforms, why do soldiers wear uniforms, firefighters, medical students,RT's, mechanics in trade schools, etc, etc, etc.


John E
Exactly! That's one of the most important ( some may consider minor ) things about our job,is our appearance. LEO,Fire Dept., Military, take the uniform as pride. How we conduct ourselves, it reflects dicipline,pride,professionalism.
 

JPINFV

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You could tell who's taking the class seriously by how they carry themselves, how they dress, how they behave in the classroom.

Clothes make the man somebody wrote once. Can't help but wonder if it's so unimportant what one wears in class why do nursing students wear scrubs, why ... medical students,...

John E
Strange, the only time I saw medical students in a uniform last year was when they were going to be in the hospital working with patients for a class (selectives or interviewing class). If all they had were lecture courses, it was jeans and a t-shirt for a lot of people. I know no one cared about what the masters students wore (and the masters program is specifically designed to help people get into medical school).
 

John E

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Ok...

take medical students in lecture only classes off the list I had, my bad.

Still doesn't refute my argument that uniforms while in training/school are a good idea. If you're going to be working in a field that pretty much universally requires a uniform to be worn while working, doesn't it make sense to require them at the early stages of training?

If someone can post a reasonable argument as to why uniforms are a bad idea or that they are a worse solution than wearing them, I'd love to read it.

John E.
 

JPINFV

Gadfly
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take medical students in lecture only classes off the list I had, my bad.

Still doesn't refute my argument that uniforms while in training/school are a good idea. If you're going to be working in a field that pretty much universally requires a uniform to be worn while working, doesn't it make sense to require them at the early stages of training?

If someone can post a reasonable argument as to why uniforms are a bad idea or that they are a worse solution than wearing them, I'd love to read it.

John E.
I'm the exact opposite. I'm not sold on the idea that uniforms do anything other than help those who can't scratch enough brain cells together to dress themselves properly. Of course, I don't mind if those people never make it into health care. I see no reason why a bunch of adults sitting inside a class room listening to someone lecture is going to come out better or worse depending on if they wear a uniform. Now when it comes to things like clinicals, then yes, a uniform is needed.

Now, to get back to your original post, what about all the other fields that don't require a uniform for their students. You don't see undergraduate students looking to get into business school wearing suites for Intro to Econ. You don't see science students wearing lab coats outside of lab classes. In fact, many of the careers you listed have students wear uniforms because it's truly needed (i.e. mechanics tend to get dirty) or because of indoctrination (military/paramilitary organization like police and fire) [indoctrination is not necessarily bad]. Professionalism is more than wearing the correct clothing. It helps, but it is more than that. I'd love to see an argument for uniforms in the class room that goes past people not being able to dress themselves properly in the field. If you're too stupid and/or lazy to tuck in a shirt without being told to, then you don't belong in any medical field.
 
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Ridryder911

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Unfortunately, the people that is attracted to EMS is not always the ones that understand professional attire or dress.

In medical school the attire may not be emphasized while in class, but it is sure enforced by many unwritten rules on the clinical setting. I know I found it ironic and canny that certain level(s) are expected to wear such attire. That second year, wore "tassels" on the loafers, that only interns wore the short lab coats and internal and cardiology residents wore the cotton button lab coats, etc. Seeing this little internal "dress code" representing hierarchy, and as well professionalism.

I know of residents that were placed upon probation because they refused to wear ties or professional dress (long sleeve shirt, tie, docker/slacks, dress or business type suit). There is an emphasis from the beginning that professionalism is demanded and expected. As most have observed there is little leniency allowed. Even Radiologist that sit in dark rooms all day, usually will have a tie on.

Maybe if we install the same attitude of expecting and demanding professionalism we too will see the results. Unfortunately, the general demeanor and type of those students that attend EMS courses are not those that have exposure and understand the boundaries. Sadly, one can usually identify EMS students from other programs. Again, the population that is attracted to this profession, the general expectation, and the poor enforcement and demand of professionalism.

One can look at themselves, beginning with the instructors. Does the instructor display professionalism. I personally wear shirts w/tie on most class period. Even on hospital clinical sites, I wear such attire with a nice lab coat. Amazing the difference of perception wearing that versus a EMS or security style "uniform" while in a hospital, both from patients and staff members.

The same irritation of even addressing one in class. My name is Mr._______ in the classroom and clinical setting, outside it is my given first name. Alike I have many physician friends whom I never call them by their first name at work and quite the opposite off duty.

EMS has grown, yet we still have a lot a room to mature. Everyone talks about the "basics" and part of the basics of the profession is how to act and display professionalism.

R/r 911
 
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Oregon

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I assist in a program that is moving to uniforms next term. As a student, I was happy wearing whatever pleased me most. Now that I am on the other side of the desks, I totally understand the pleas for uniforms from the instructors.
Discipline, pride, safety, all good reasons for uniforms. Not to mention the nasty -grams coming back from clinical sites about students not showing up dressed appropriately.
But the number one reason I lobbied for implementation is...covering up the hairy backsides of people while they are bending over right in my face. I don't care to know what sort of undies the students are wearing. Lots of bending over in EMT basic class<_<
This means I have to wear the same uniform as an assistant, but I'll live with the white shirt if I don't ever have to see what I've seen again.
 

Blacke00

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You could tell who's taking the class seriously by how they carry themselves, how they dress, how they behave in the classroom.
I agree 100% with this...
Just last night the guy sitting next to me, who drives 1.5 hours to get to this class, didn't bring any of his books to class, got a 50 on the quiz, and then proceded to carry on a text messaging conversation under the table during the entire lecture on the introduction to the Cardiovascular and Musculoskeletal systems...
 
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