EMT-I

Ray1129

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Hey guys, I know not everyone (maybe not anyone at all) is from Maryland, but I was wondering if anyone knows how many hours MD's EMTI program is? If you don't know, can you tell me how long it is in your jurisdiction? I'm sure *that'll* give me at least a general idea of how long it is. Thanks guys. :lol:

Ray
 

SafetyPro2

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In California, in the counties that offer it, the training consists of 210 hours of classroom and skills and 96 hours of combined hospital clinical training and field internship (which must include at least 20 ALS patient contacts) for a total of 306 hours.
 

ffemt8978

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In Washington, it varies by county but the program I just completed was 36 hours classroom with no clinical time (6 days for 6 hours per day). You have to get 10 successful IV patient sticks before you take the test, then you have to get 36 sticks (1/2 can be mannequin) in the next three years to keep your cert. After that, you have to get 1 stick every 3 years to maintain it.

In Iowa, I took the class that met National Registry standards, but I don't remember how many hours it was.
 

medicfire909

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I am not from Maryland but as a tenager venturing to college I attended UMBC Univeristy of Maryland at Baltimore County. Which has a very good Emergency Health Sciences tract essentially the college degree for people looking for a career in EMS or the Fire Service.

I'd definitely refer you to http://ehs.umbc.edu/

The Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services Systems oversees the Emergency Medical Services throughout Maryland. Their web site is www.miemss.org this site is filled with answer to justa bout anything about the EMS system in Maryland.

Maryland does not have a Intermediate level the same as other areas of the US does. Maryland is a three level system

Emergency Medical Technican - Basic 131 hours
Emergency Medical Technician - Cardiac Rescue Technician 240 hours
Emergency Medical Technician - Paramedic 500 hours


Hopefully this answers your question

Julie
 
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Ray1129

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Maryland does not have a Intermediate level the same as other areas of the US does. Maryland is a three level system

Emergency Medical Technican - Basic 131 hours
Emergency Medical Technician - Cardiac Rescue Technician 240 hours
Emergency Medical Technician - Paramedic 500 hours

Actually, you're wrong about the Cardiac Technician part. Maryland is getting rid of Cardiac Rescue Technician's. I don't quite remember by which year it is, but CRTI's will be phased out and I's will be grandfathered in and trained. CRTI classes are no longer being taught, but EMTI classes are....I'm presently in one.

I just couldn't find where the hours were located....I'm doing something for my firehouse in regards to MFRI (Maryland Fire and Rescue Institute) and MIEMSS (Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Systems Services) hours....

I appreciate it though! That does help.

Ray
 

medicfire909

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I only experience the Maryland EMS system in the early 1990's and things do change but at least the web site had the information you needed. I benefit big time from their system though because Maryland didn't have an exact fit for me for reciprocity from NY as a CCT so they did let me as an RN challenge the Paramedic exams. When I moved back to NY the accepted it for reciprocity back to NY.

Good luck in the EMTI course.

Julie
 

rescuecpt

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We don't offer EMT-I in Suffolk County NY, just EMT-B, EMT-CC, and EMT-P.

My EMT-CC class consisted of:

160 classroom hours (approx 5hrs per week for 32 weeks)
63 hrs clinical rotations (20 ER, 20 OR/Resp, 10 CCU, 8 Phleb, 5 Medical Control)
90 hrs riding time (60 BLS, 30 ALS, from sig 2 enroute to sig 5 leaving hospital)
8-station BLS practical (8 hrs)
10-station ALS practical (8 hrs)
County protocol exam (1 hr)
State BLS exam (2 hrs)
State ALS exam (6 hrs)

That doesn't include all of the out-of-class study sessions, non-call time just waiting for a call (doesn't count for anything), and study time.

It was a lot of work - especially because I work 60 - 70 hrs a week, but I am very glad I did it and I love what I do even more now.
 
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