EMT for racetrack

RebelAngel

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I've been offered a job at a local racetrack, first as and Aid, and then as EMT when I get certified..

My Chief said in all the years he's been racing at the track there has only been one person taken away by ambulance and that most of the treatments are for people that work on the cars.

It opens in April or early May, the NYS written test date is May 15. It'll take 6-8 to see if I passed and become a certified EMT or failed, unless I go to an on-site scoring facility hours away and pay to test.

I didn't start this with the intention of being an paid EMT. I started this because I was approached by the EMS Captain of the volunteer FD in the town I live (we go to the same church), saw and need, and decided to help the FD and community. I have no prior medical, EMS, or FD experience or training, or racing experience, basically I've started from step 1 where most of the other people in the EMT class have some sort of medical or FD experience.

Help me work through this in my head. What are things I should consider or be aware of? Questions I should ask?
 

Handsome Robb

Youngin'
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I'm not understanding the question.

So the volly FD you're a member of provides medical coverage for a local racetrack and they're asking you if you're interested in it or is it a separate gig altogether?

Without a medical director and protocols you can only practice first aid, which isn't a huge deal considering you're going to be an EMT. Also, insurance coverage for the company which you work is important.
 
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RebelAngel

RebelAngel

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Totally separate from volunteer FD. Owner just came to Chief because they know eachother I guess.
 

mycrofft

Still crazy but elsewhere
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Equine or engine? (Had to do that!).:rofl:

I've done both/both (equine versus engine, and FA versus BLS).

As first aid, you have basic guidelines and limited equipment (don't bring anything more involved than shears unless you are prepared to take personal civil responsibility for your actions without protection by the employer) and limited mission, but since you operate under track tules and basic training, you don't need medical direction.

As an EMT you need medical direction; ask to see their EMT protocols, see who signed each one off as medical director, maybe ask that doctor if they review them periodically. And they should, again, either provide equipment, or specify in hiring they expect you to bring it (and pay you for getting it; I do not think EMTs are expected to maintain professional tool kits as it were).

My experience: with horses, expect upper extremity injuries to jockeys, maybe a crushed finger or foot, but they will not come in with minor stuff; tough, tough, tough, and they don't get paid unless they ride. Do not get talked into "taping someone up", that requires training. Ditto giving injections. People in the stands will be your biggest worry; heart attack, sprained ankles, intoxication, heat related illness.

Mortorcycles: again, tough tough tough. Clavicles, maybe closed head concussion or neck, but anything can go. Pit crew crushes and owies. Dirt bike is safer than track.

Cars: mostly in the stands. Added potential for pit crew injuries or spectator injuries; my experience there is second hand.
 

DrParasite

The fire extinguisher is not just for show
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My Chief said in all the years he's been racing at the track there has only been one person taken away by ambulance and that most of the treatments are for people that work on the cars.
that's cool. buddy of mine is the second in charge of a motor cross racetrack. they have hosted warp tour there, dirt bike races, and car races. He told me that the busiest trauma day for him was when he he transported 4 femur fractures with traction splints applied to the trauma center, two of whom were flown out. for the warped tour, they had hot weather + alcohol and drugs = MCI and request for ambulances and EMS Task force resources. if all goes well, there are no injuries, but when it rains, it pours.
It opens in April or early May, the NYS written test date is May 15. It'll take 6-8 to see if I passed and become a certified EMT or failed, unless I go to an on-site scoring facility hours away and pay to test.
I took the onsite test.... it was worth the 2 hour drive and pay to know what the results were before I left.
Help me work through this in my head. What are things I should consider or be aware of? Questions I should ask?
a job is a job, go for it, what do you have to lose?
 

mycrofft

Still crazy but elsewhere
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