Duty to Act?

PotatoMedic

Has no idea what I'm doing.
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Paywall bs
I somehow got through. Defib kept saying continue CPR. Mom says it malfunctioned. Mom also says the crew was slow to respond.

Who knows what actually happened. Tragic none the less.
 
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Phillyrube

Phillyrube

Leading Chief
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Do you commercial aircraft crews have Duty to Act?


Try this link.

 

CCCSD

Forum Deputy Chief
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Nah…. All FC get trained in BLS/AED use. It’s an FAA standard. Although I’ve only trained Corporate AC, I don’t believe anyone would just twiddle their thumbs in an emergency.

There is zero difference in AEDs so that claim is utter BS.

Parents just want money.
 

DrParasite

The fire extinguisher is not just for show
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Taking a CPR class two years ago and staying calm and remembering what to do during an actual emergency are two different things. How was the crew slow to respond? you are in a contained area, and if you shout your son isn't breathing, I don't think anyone will ignore you...

If someone is not breathing, start CPR. it's not that hard. Laypeople are taught to push on the chest hard and fast. If their heart hasn't stopped yet, it will shortly.

How did the Defib malfunction? need more information. regardless, push hard and fast.

The family is hurting, and I don't blame them for suing; to be honest, I hope AA settles for compensatory damages, and gives them some closure for their son dying on the their airplane.

True story: if you give me a zoll defib, and tell me to use it, I will look like a person f*$%# a football. if you give me a lifepak, I will look like a trained and competent provider. different brands have different quirks, and they do operate differently, while doing the same thing. So yes, there are subtle differences that can affect the comfort of a person using it.
 

CCCSD

Forum Deputy Chief
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The FC train on their equipment and Safety training is ongoing.
1. Power on.
2. Pads on.
3. Analyze and act.
 

E tank

Caution: Paralyzing Agent
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"I want American Airlines to take full responsibility for Kevin's death." Full responsibility. 14 year old's don't up and arrest. Something really bad caused that. That this just didn't go to settlement says a lot about what AA believes about what happened. The family is surely going to be awarded something regardless of the facts, but AA is prolly betting going to court and paying the decision will be less expensive than settling for whatever plaintiff's attorneys are demanding.
 

MMiz

I put the M in EMTLife
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CFR 121.803 requires US passenger planes to carry med kits and AEDs.

US flight attendants are required to be trained in CPR and first aid, but are not required to be certified, and many aren't certified.

Flight attendant recurrent training is only every two years.

The reality of medical emergencies onboard seems to be to notify the flight deck, make a PA announcement to ask for trained medical staff on board, and then connect with contracted medical control.

We'll see how this plays out, but I can see how in any environment non-medical providers wouldn't instantly recognize cardiac arrest and might be hesitant to start CPR.
 

FiremanMike

Just a dude
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Out hospital cardiac arrest survival rate to discharge with normal neuro function is somewhere in the 6-7% range. As cold as it is to say, that poor kid had a 93% chance of not surviving this event. Suing the minimally trained flight crew for the poor outcome just sucks.

I get it, I can't even imagine how distraught I'd be if my 14 year old died, but I think this is just another example of the distorted views we have in this country on what happens when your heart stops.
 

johnrsemt

Forum Deputy Chief
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Problem with TV and movies: anyone who dies comes back with 3 compressions and/or 1 shock.
They don't they die for the biggest part.
I worked 7 viable (seen arrest, CPR started fast) cardiac arrests in January, 1 survived, and he was the one who shouldn't have; the oldest and in the worst medical shape.
1st rule of EMS: people die,
2nd rule: we can't change #1 often
 

FiremanMike

Just a dude
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Problem with TV and movies: anyone who dies comes back with 3 compressions and/or 1 shock.
They don't they die for the biggest part.
I worked 7 viable (seen arrest, CPR started fast) cardiac arrests in January, 1 survived, and he was the one who shouldn't have; the oldest and in the worst medical shape.
1st rule of EMS: people die,
2nd rule: we can't change #1 often
In 27 years of EMS and 2 as an RN, I’ve seen plenty of ROSC, and had a handful of people discharged with normal neuron function. I’ve only ever seen one person wake up normal immediately after resuscitation (it was an ems run and he started in v-fib, was pretty cool).
 
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