Does Sodium/Dextrose Have a Drug Classification?

chaz90

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Sodium bicarbonate; Sodium chloride or something else? Electrolyte would be my classification if sodium is the active agent in question. I consider dextrose kind of in a class of its own. You could call it a carbohydrate if you really wanted to classify it for some reason.
 

DesertMedic66

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Sodium bicarbonate; Sodium chloride or something else? Electrolyte would be my classification if sodium is the active agent in question. I consider dextrose kind of in a class of its own. You could call it a carbohydrate if you really wanted to classify it for some reason.
Per my drug book for medic school dextrose is classified as a carbohydrate and sodium is an electrolyte.
 
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Anonymous

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Sodium Chloride. I thought electrolyte or uncategorized/miscellaneous. And Dextrose being a class of its own is what I thought.

Thanks guys!
 

TransportJockey

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Also can be considered a crystaloid when used as infusions
 

STXmedic

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Why do you think hypOtonic?
Dextrose is isotonic until the dextrose is utilized by the cells, then it has a hypotonic effect. When the cells use the dextrose, fluid shifts inside of the cell as well, thus the hypotonic effect.
 

usalsfyre

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Why do you think hypOtonic?
Because dextrose is absorbed and metabolized into the cells rapidly, leaving only free water. While something like D50 may be initially hyperosmolar (and causing resultant tissues destruction if it gets out of the vascular system) the time that dextrose molecules are in the vascular system is not long enough to cause a fluid shift outward. Meaning you're left with only the sterile water it was dissolved in, which is pretty much the definition of hypotonic. This is one of the reasons you won't see D5 on TBI patients unless it's absolutely essential.
 

STXmedic

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I like usals' explanation better...
 

gnosis

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Up here I see dextrose categorized as an "anti hypoglycemic agent" a fair bit. But we like to sound fancy.
 

Burritomedic1127

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I can see what you guys are saying. Was taught in medic school and was under the impression that dextrose, specifically D50, was hypertonic due to the high osmolarity pressure of a high concentration solute. Which would make sense when IVs with D50 are extravasated causing necrosis because its dehydrating cells of the tissue
 

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