Difference between ratio-Oxycocet/OxyContin/etc

nomofica

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I'm posting this in the ALS section just because of the more advanced knowledge in pharmacology.

Just out of curiosity, what is the difference between ratio-Oxycocet, OxyContin, Oxycodone, etc. I'm under the impression that they're exactly the same, or at least for the most part. I know they're all opioid analgesics, share the same contra/indications, rxns, same txs...

I guess the only difference I see between them is are the names and dosages of the drug?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Analgesic
 

nibejeebies

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I could be wrong on this but I was under the impression that the different names are the trade names. Different manufacturers for the same stuff.

But then again I could be wrong. I'm just an EMT-IV
 

drdique

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I'm posting this in the ALS section just because of the more advanced knowledge in pharmacology.

Just out of curiosity, what is the difference between ratio-Oxycocet, OxyContin, Oxycodone, etc. I'm under the impression that they're exactly the same, or at least for the most part. I know they're all opioid analgesics, share the same contra/indications, rxns, same txs...

I guess the only difference I see between them is are the names and dosages of the drug?
The are pretty much the same thing. Oxycodone is the synthetically derived opiate. Oxycontin and ratio-oxycocet are brand names. The ending '-cet' implies that the oxycodone is combined with acetaminophen. Other combinations include ibuprofen and ASA. These are rarer form what i understand. Percocet and apo-endocet are other acetaminophen based brands available. Most commonly the oral dosage is 5mg oxycodone with 500mg of acetaminophen. This 5mg of oxycodone is comparable in efficacy to 5mg Morphine, or so i'm told. These are canadian numbers based on a prescription i personally had post-op. Cant speak on how accurate they are south of the border.
 

daedalus

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Oxycodone is the generic name for Oxycotin, which is a trade name, created by a manufacture. I could not tell you what the other drug you mentioned is.
 

DV_EMT

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Oxycocet is a medication thats usually found in canada. Its a combination of oxycodone and acetaminophen. Here in the us its also known as Percocet or Roxicet

Oxycontin - the brand name for oxycodone.

thats the easy breakdown...but of course theres a lot to the pharmacology behind both. I'd go into them, but its kinda monotonus unless your really into drugs :p
 

nomofica

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Oxycocet is a medication thats usually found in canada. Its a combination of oxycodone and acetaminophen. Here in the us its also known as Percocet or Roxicet

Oxycontin - the brand name for oxycodone.

thats the easy breakdown...but of course theres a lot to the pharmacology behind both. I'd go into them, but its kinda monotonus unless your really into drugs :p
So in otherwords, there's not a whole lot different other than the inert binders like acetominophen, acetylsalicytic acid or ibuprofin?
 

Afflixion

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yes it's all the same for the most part just different manufacturers brand names. Other than that it's just what NSIDs they put in them to make them "unique"
 

nomofica

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okay, thanks!
 

fma08

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So in otherwords, there's not a whole lot different other than the inert binders like acetominophen, acetylsalicytic acid or ibuprofin?
Last I checked, APAP, ASA, and IBU weren't inert ingredients, if I'm wrong, point me in the right direction please. ^_^
 

drdique

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You're correct, they aren't inert binders. Things like methylcelluose are binders that make the pill stick together.
The Acet/ASA/Ibup are added to work synergystically with the opiate by inhibiting prostoglandin synthesis. This is also true in T3's (Codeine, Acetominophen, Caffeine) (The caffeine increase the efficacy of Acetominophen)

The acetominophen is favourable compared to the NSAID's in patients with HTN as NSAID's cause a rise in BP.
 

nomofica

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ah, my bad.

again, this is why i posted this here. my knowledge base on pharmacology is quite limited, especially at my scope of practice.
 

kate5497

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I'm posting this in the ALS section just because of the more advanced knowledge in pharmacology.

Just out of curiosity, what is the difference between ratio-Oxycocet, OxyContin, Oxycodone, etc. I'm under the impression that they're exactly the same, or at least for the most part. I know they're all opioid analgesics, share the same contra/indications, rxns, same txs...

I guess the only difference I see between them is are the names and dosages of the drug?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Analgesic
I am currently addicted to Ratio oxycocet and the difference is it is not an extended release tab but it is 5mg oxycodone combined with 5 mg of acetaminophen.
Here is an actual quote from Med broadcast for you.
"This combination product contains two medications: oxycodone and acetaminophen. Acetaminophen belongs to the group of medications called analgesics (pain relievers) and antipyretics (fever reducers). Oxycodone belongs to the group of medications called narcotic analgestics. Oxycodone - acetaminophen is used to relieve moderate to moderately severe pain, including conditions associated with fever."
 

fma08

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I am currently addicted to Ratio oxycocet and the difference is it is not an extended release tab but it is 5mg oxycodone combined with 5 mg of acetaminophen.
Here is an actual quote from Med broadcast for you.
"This combination product contains two medications: oxycodone and acetaminophen. Acetaminophen belongs to the group of medications called analgesics (pain relievers) and antipyretics (fever reducers). Oxycodone belongs to the group of medications called narcotic analgestics. Oxycodone - acetaminophen is used to relieve moderate to moderately severe pain, including conditions associated with fever."
Only 5mg of acetaminophen? Wow, I haven't seen a dosing that low of it before...
 

mycrofft

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So in otherwords, there's not a whole lot different other than the inert binders like acetominophen, acetylsalicytic acid or ibuprofin?
Inert binders? FAIL:rofl:
 

mycrofft

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So in otherwords, there's not a whole lot different other than the inert binders like acetominophen, acetylsalicytic acid or ibuprofin?
Inert binders? FAIL:rofl:

PS: This includes kate 5497's only response or post. :ph34r:
 

jwk

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Not quite right on the oxycodone / Oxycontin info.

Oxycodone is indeed a synthetic narcotic, one of the most powerful ones commercially available in the US. It is commonly used for acute pain from injuries, surgery, etc. It is frequently combined with acetaminophen (Percocet), and comes in dosages of 2.5 - 10 mg per tablet.

Oxycontin is oxycodone in an EXTENDED RELEASE formulation and is used more for chronic pain conditions. It is available in 10, 20, 40, and 80mg tablets. Oxycontin tablets should NEVER be broken or crushed to be taken, since that destroys the time-release characteristics of the pill and allows the full dose of oxycodone to be delivered all at once, sometimes with fatal consequences.
 

rogersam5

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The Acet/ASA/Ibup are added to work synergystically with the opiate by inhibiting prostoglandin synthesis. This is also true in T3's (Codeine, Acetominophen, Caffeine) (The caffeine increase the efficacy of Acetominophen)

The acetominophen is favourable compared to the NSAID's in patients with HTN as NSAID's cause a rise in BP.
I would say sort of, I would imaging the Acetaminophen, ASA, and Ibuprofen were added to provide some cross benefit of mild anti-inflammatory action and pain relief from that end of the pathway. The T3s you speak of I would be more inclined to say the addition of caffeine was to induce vasoconstriction and reverse a current believed cause of migraines (rapid widespread cerbro-vasodiolation).

And as far as NSAIDs increasing BP, that may be true (studies showing a mean increase of 4mmHG of MAP) are there, but more recent reviews and meta analysis are showing that the cardiovascular risk from apap might be the same if not worse then the traditional NSAIDs, owing to a mean increase in HR noted in some strides, I can get into an epidemiological tirade about the quality of some of the APAP studies that i will refrain from here. Additionally, NSAIDs are typically, COX inhibitors (COX2 specific inhibitors were pulled after significant cardiovascular risks were shown i.e. vioxx) interestingly enough patients with a high enough risk of cardiovascular incidents are told to take small daily doses of ASA, a COX inhibitor.....

Not quite right on the oxycodone / Oxycontin info.

Oxycodone is indeed a synthetic narcotic, one of the most powerful ones commercially available in the US. It is commonly used for acute pain from injuries, surgery, etc. It is frequently combined with acetaminophen (Percocet), and comes in dosages of 2.5 - 10 mg per tablet.

Oxycontin is oxycodone in an EXTENDED RELEASE formulation and is used more for chronic pain conditions. It is available in 10, 20, 40, and 80mg tablets. Oxycontin tablets should NEVER be broken or crushed to be taken, since that destroys the time-release characteristics of the pill and allows the full dose of oxycodone to be delivered all at once, sometimes with fatal consequences.
Yup
 
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