Did I do everything I could have/did I do anything wrong?

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Sasha

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DNRs count?


If so, yes.

Ditto. We do quite a few hospice calls. Ive watched a few die en route, and sometimes held their hands more for my comfort than theirs.

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hippocratical

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Wow, I'm a crotchety old bαstard but even I am amazed at the response of the experienced crowd here.

You're a trained medical first responder (or whatever local nomenclature). You have the skill set to actually help someone. If we change this from MVA to someone having trouble in a Walmart (relative scene safety aside from Mullets everywhere) would you walk-on-by too?

Sure an EMT-B might not have the super razor sharp assessment skills of a Paramedicgod, but there's still help that can be provided.

If the scene is dangerous - Don't go in. If the scene turns dangerous - GTFO. No BSI PPE? - Don't touch 'em. Not authorised to do procedure ABC? - Don't do procedure ABC. No equipment? - Do your best! To not even assess is madness!

In the OPs case there was no help to be provided. But you don't know till you go see. Maybe the driver could have had a C-Spine injury and her freaked-out boyfriend is trying to yank her out of the car by her head. Who knows.

I'm an innately selfish person but I'm baffled by the thought process of "Sucks to be them, see ya"
 

HotelCo

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You're a trained medical first responder (or whatever local nomenclature). You have the skill set to actually help someone. If we change this from MVA to someone having trouble in a Walmart (relative scene safety aside from Mullets everywhere) would you walk-on-by too?

Unless there's an immediate, known life threat (choking is what comes to mind), then yes, I will walk on by.

Edit: even at that point, I wouldn't identify myself as a paramedic.

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bstone

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The book says we have a "moral and ethical" obligation to respond to emergencies that we happen to come across while off-duty. Legality isn't the only thing that is very important to EMTs. We're health care providers. Ethics and morality is just as important as legality, if not more important.
 

Martyn

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The book says we have a "moral and ethical" obligation to respond to emergencies that we happen to come across while off-duty. Legality isn't the only thing that is very important to EMTs. We're health care providers. Ethics and morality is just as important as legality, if not more important.

I think that sums it up quite well...moral and ethical...did we not become first responders/EMT's/paramedics etc to help our fellow man (or woman), or have we become so jaded we have forgotten?
 

hippocratical

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You have no tools with you. You can't do anything to help anyone.

I find this sort of thing weird too - If this were the case, then why do organisations like the Red Cross spend time and money training millions of people around the world First Aid? They sure as hell can do less than an EMT-B!
 

Anjel

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I find this sort of thing weird too - If this were the case, then why do organisations like the Red Cross spend time and money training millions of people around the world First Aid? They sure as hell can do less than an EMT-B!

No bandages, no equipment, no PPE at all.

She could stand there look at a person and saw oohh they need an ambulance. It was dangerous to stop on the side of a high way. People were already standing outside of their car. I really don't see a need to stop.

If I saw a car flipping of the road and landing upside down in the ditch full of water. And I at least had my reflective jacket and gloves with me. I would stop.

But the accident had already happened. They were out of the car. Nothing life threatening. 911 was already called. No reason to put your self in danger
 

Sasha

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I think that sums it up quite well...moral and ethical...did we not become first responders/EMT's/paramedics etc to help our fellow man (or woman), or have we become so jaded we have forgotten?

I did it because i like medicine.

Morality wont protect you from a texting driver or a law suit.

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Sasha

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And really how many more people are you going to help if youre dead, maimed, or homeless?

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Anjel

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[YOUTUBE]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=To1EYtzmQRw[/YOUTUBE]

And when its just you in your POV this is a very real possibility too. At least with the ambulance I can park in a way in which I hope can protect me.
 

Sasha

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[YOUTUBE]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=To1EYtzmQRw[/YOUTUBE]

And when its just you in your POV this is a very real possibility too. At least with the ambulance I can park in a way in which I hope can protect me.

And even if it doesn't protect you, you are covered if you're hit.
 

Tigger

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And when its just you in your POV this is a very real possibility too. At least with the ambulance I can park in a way in which I hope can protect me.

And even then, I hope fire is coming is coming with one of their 25,000 pound apparati that will have a much better chance of diverting an errant vehicle.
 

JPINFV

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The book says we have a "moral and ethical" obligation to respond to emergencies that we happen to come across while off-duty. Legality isn't the only thing that is very important to EMTs. We're health care providers. Ethics and morality is just as important as legality, if not more important.


...and who ever wrote that text book can include anything they want about their moral code. However I don't have to abide by someone else's moral code.
 

bstone

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It's the EMT moral code. If you don't wish to abide by it then you ought to stop being an EMT. BTW, it's the AAOS that wrote it. Shall I provide a page number for you?
 

Sasha

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Thirdly, the Code is more what you'd call guidelines than actual rules

barbossa-thumb.jpg
 
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JPINFV

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It's the EMT moral code. If you don't wish to abide by it then you ought to stop being an EMT. BTW, it's the AAOS that wrote it. Shall I provide a page number for you?


...why should I care what the AAOS puts out if I don't want to be an orthopedic surgeon?

If I don't want to abide by it? I never remember giving an oath to uphold it to begin with.

Finally, the definition to "respond" is left to interpretation. Ensuring that 911 has been called is "responding" appropriately to the vast number of emergencies out there.
 

bstone

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Then I assume you also don't care about being an EMT? Just saying since the AAOS writes the EMT book and also run the Emergency Care and Safety Institute.
 

JPINFV

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AAOS writes a book. There are other books out there. Similarly, running a training institute means nothing, or is AMR similarly godly for running NCTI?
 

IvanD

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I think we might be upset at the wrong people, I feel that other countries might have a vastly different view on this issue based on how likely the medical provider is to be sued in an event of a mishap (in the scenario where scene is safe).
 

bstone

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So if writing the book, setting the standards and running a training institute isn't good enough then what is?
 
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