Criminal Backgrounds and DMV

FiremanMike

EMS Coordinator
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As a side note - it can be extremely difficult to overcome a felony lifestyle. I commend you for working hard to do the right thing and live a productive life. Moving into EMS
will probably be tough for you given your record and you will face adversity. Stay straight, keep driving forward.
 

SandpitMedic

Crowd pleaser
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Akulahawk

EMT-P/ED RN
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Hey guys. Wondering about C.A DMV and Criminal backgrounds. Has anybody else had a brush in with the law (felony or minor offence) and still got Ambulance Cert. I was Approved by NREMT and was Licensed by C.A state EMS office. Just getting ready to fight the DMV. I do not have any driving offences, NO DUIs or anything related. Just took some stuff that did not belong to me over 7 years ago (was charged with Burglary at the age of 19) Just wanted to get some tips and what to expect.
Thanks
-Jonathan R
State licensed me with 3 years probation and did an intensive interrogation on me, NREMT did the same. I was wondering if I'd have to get filtered by the DMV as well. Being that NREMT and State did that already. So it kind feels like a fight to me.
This stuff that I have highlighted are a couple things that stood out to me. I doubt you'll have any major issue with the DMV. It sounds to me like you're a new EMT that's getting ready to apply for a first job in this field. As long as you stay out of trouble, you should be OK after the 3 year probation period is over. Make sure you know exactly what's considered a violation of that probation period as you won't get a second chance. Once you get your Ambulance Driving Cert, you should start driving your own car like the proverbial granny because your personal driving habits/tickets/etc will have an effect upon your ability to drive ambulances. The DMV will pull your ADL before they'll suspend your regular DL.

Now then, the fact that you were charged with Burglary (usually a Felony) is something that is going to follow you for the rest of your life, even if you were not convicted of that charge. Many entities are going to want dispositions of that charge. Make sure you have documentation of the disposition of your case, especially if the charge was reduced, dropped, or you plead guilty/no contest to a lesser charge. If I'm interviewing you and asked you about previous criminal history and you replied to me as you did above, you just told me that you haven't changed your attitude much and I wouldn't be hiring you. This is because you are attempting to minimize what happened in the past. You also didn't say what your conviction was, just that you were "charged" with Burglary. You want a job? Don't minimize, don't play a victim. You're not a victim of anything except what you did. You committed a crime. You're an adult, you take responsibility for what you did.

If you told me you were convicted of Burglary at 19, did your time, stayed out of trouble/changed your circumstances, and fought to get an EMT cert, I would see that as someone that's an adult, responsible, and perhaps worthy of a chance.

One of my past EMT partners (one of the best I'd ever had) was a man who was convicted of a felony, kept his nose clean after doing his time, and demonstrated every day that he was worthy of the trust he'd earned. Perhaps he'd be a great medic, if he is ever allowed to earn that license as he's an excellent example of someone able to overcome his past.
 

Akulahawk

EMT-P/ED RN
Community Leader
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It’s true. CA DMV is...don’t get me started!
Yeah. CA DMV is... and more. Efficient isn't one of their attributes.
 

MEDicJohn

Forum Probie
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State licensed me with 3 years probation and did an intensive interrogation on me, NREMT did the same. I was wondering if I'd have to get filtered by the DMV as well. Being that NREMT and State did that already. So it kind feels like a fight to me.


Now this is company dependent, but i know in San Diego where i operate companies will not hire people with probationary state license. It is too much of a "RISK". Best piece of advice is to allow this probationary period to pass while maintaining cert. Unfortunately with how legal heavy the state of California is you're going to be fighting a very tough battle. Best of luck
 

FelonaEMT

Forum Ride Along
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Very true, although it is likely a misdemeanor. Felons cannot get an NREMT card to my knowledge, not be certified by CA. It may be an issue in the future for an interview, and you will likely be easily terminated if any accusations of theft or misdeed arises given the history.
Given the time since your conviction and the fact you already have your certifications after the fact- I think you’ll have no issues.
Yes you can get NREMT card and be certified in CA ! JS I am both thank you and my felony was considered a violent felony!
 

mgr22

Forum Deputy Chief
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Yes you can get NREMT card and be certified in CA ! JS I am both thank you and my felony was considered a violent felony!

So, you're a 43-year-old violent felon who's nationally registered and certified in CA as an AEMT. I have to ask: Do you think that's a good thing?
 

DrParasite

The fire extinguisher is not just for show
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So, you're a 43-year-old violent felon who's nationally registered and certified in CA as an AEMT. I have to ask: Do you think that's a good thing?
apparently he or she thinks so... I want to know if he was able to get a job in EMS with that on his background.

Then again, with some places, if you have a pulse and a patch...
 

ffemt8978

Forum Vice-Principal
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From another perspective, the guy made a terrible choice... --24 years ago--

Does he never get a chance to live a normal life again?
This...

We seem to be schizophrenic as a society in how we deal with convicts. We demand that people be given a second chance yet also demand that their previous mistakes follow them forever which keeps them from finding decent housing and employment.
 

DrParasite

The fire extinguisher is not just for show
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We seem to be schizophrenic as a society in how we deal with convicts. We demand that people be given a second chance yet also demand that their previous mistakes follow them forever which keeps them from finding decent housing and employment.
Sure.... so a felony arson conviction 24 years ago... are you hiring him for your FD? a child molestation conviction 24 years ago... are you hiring him to be your daughter's preschool teacher? so a vehicular manslaughter conviction 24 years ago for killing someone while driving drunk... are you ok putting him in the driver's seat of your engine? a criminal conviction for armed robbery... are you comfortable letting him in your house when your mother has chest pains? and when her jewelry is missing after the crew leaves, who is going to be suspect #1? you have a person who was evicted from his previous home because he was arrested for dealing drugs out of his home... do you want him to be your neighbor?

Don't get me wrong, I think we need to rethink our plan to reintroduce people to society, however, there is also personal responsibility, and people need to understand that their actions have real consequences. This might be one of those examples, where a crime that you committed 2 decades ago has consequences today.

think of it from the employer/landlord perspective: you have two identical applicants, one with a felony conviction and one without... who are you hiring?
 

mgr22

Forum Deputy Chief
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So, you're a 43-year-old violent felon who's nationally registered and certified in CA as an AEMT. I have to ask: Do you think that's a good thing?

For the record, I meant this as the question it is, not as criticism. I'd really like to know what he thinks.
 

ffemt8978

Forum Vice-Principal
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Sure.... so a felony arson conviction 24 years ago... are you hiring him for your FD? a child molestation conviction 24 years ago... are you hiring him to be your daughter's preschool teacher? so a vehicular manslaughter conviction 24 years ago for killing someone while driving drunk... are you ok putting him in the driver's seat of your engine? a criminal conviction for armed robbery... are you comfortable letting him in your house when your mother has chest pains? and when her jewelry is missing after the crew leaves, who is going to be suspect #1? you have a person who was evicted from his previous home because he was arrested for dealing drugs out of his home... do you want him to be your neighbor?

Don't get me wrong, I think we need to rethink our plan to reintroduce people to society, however, there is also personal responsibility, and people need to understand that their actions have real consequences. This might be one of those examples, where a crime that you committed 2 decades ago has consequences today.

think of it from the employer/landlord perspective: you have two identical applicants, one with a felony conviction and one without... who are you hiring?
Entirely depends on the specifics of the case, and not the broad terms used in the statutory language to make the law cover as much as possible...which also gived politically motivated prosecutors more reason to upcharge on the indictments.

Just tossing out responses to your scenarios:

Felony Arson - what if the charges were caused by shooting off fireworks that caused something to accidentally burn?

Child Molestation: not going to go there because that subject causes too many people to stop thinking and instead react emotionally.

DUI Manslaughter: I would if the person has been sober with no other problems for the past 24 years.

Armed robbery: same thing goes. If he hasn't been in any other trouble for the past 24 years. Armed robbery is one of those amazingly broad charges that can cover more than people realize.

What is a person to do once they are released? They can't get a job, nor should they be able to live anywhere because they will always be somebody's neighbor.

And I agree with you about the prosoective employer. They're not willing to take on the potential liability, so they're obviously going to pick the one without the record.
 

CANMAN

Forum Asst. Chief
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From another perspective, the guy made a terrible choice... --24 years ago--

Does he never get a chance to live a normal life again?

From another perspective, maybe it wasn't even a terrible choice... Some people need to catch an *** whooping every once in a blue moon🤕
 

SandpitMedic

Crowd pleaser
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Here’s the thing. We are in a position of public trust- like it or not. Once you’ve stained that (as someone made plenty of examples of earlier) you forfeit certain rights and limit your options for your future.

I personally believe we need need criminal justice reform as well as changes to some laws in this nation with regard to some crimes. There are a lot of BS laws and BS penalties on the books, but a violent felony? That’s just one of those mistakes you can’t make, nor should people make excuses for. Does it mean that one is a terrible person- no, of course not. Although, some actions have lasting consequences.

If right and wrong don’t factor into someone’s moral compass, those lasting consequences are meant to be the deterrent.
 

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