Camping First Aid Kit/Station Suggestions

MedicSqrl

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I work a festival at the Ocala National forest in Florida. Its held once in the summer and winter. My group is mostly FR's with one or two EMT's/PM's. As of now our first aid supplies are mostly donated so we get a lot of random things and trying to get it organized is a hassle. I wanted to post a list of things I have complied so far. These supplies need to service a 300+ person festival. For the most part we have have a cabin where most of the first aid happens. There is also tent near the vendors area where people can take simple supplies like aspirin and band-aids. Finally there is a golf cart with some things to respond to incidents. This is a complete list of everything I would need, then I would have to decide what amounts of which go in to each area. So any suggestions on what more I could use and what to put in where is appreciated. Thanks for all the suggestions in advance.



Trauma/Wound Care
Plastic bandages
Fabric bandages
Knuckle bandages
Fingertip bandages
Elbow & knee plastic bandages
Medium butterfly wound closures
2" x 2" Sterile Dressing
3"x3" Sterile Dressing
4" x 4" Sterile Dressing
Super Stop bandage
2" Kling
Triangular sling/bandage
Cohesive elastic bandage wrap
Cold packs
Sam "Splints"

OTC Meds
Antacid tablets
Advil
Extra-strength Advil
Aspirin
Anti-Diarrhea tablets
Benadryl

Cleaning/Itching/Burning
Alcohol wipes
Antiseptic cleansing wipes (Sting Free)
Antiseptic spray
Triple antibiotic ointment packs
Hydrocortisone cream
Insect Bite Wipes
Insect Repellent
Iodine infection control wipes
Spray on bandage
Burn relief packs
Burn spray
Poison Ivy/etc Cream
Sun Screen
Burn Kit
Snake/Bee kit

Misc/Special
Tape
Moleskin
Eye Pads
Eye wash
Eye Drops
CPR Mask
Q-tips
Gloves S/M/L
Scissors
Tweezers
Tampons/Pads
Bio bags
Sharps box
thermometer
 

mycrofft

Still crazy but elsewhere
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Use SEARCH also, but now is a good time to start your planning.

You have a lot of variety, you could pare it down a little.
It's axiomatic that you can't have too much sterile normal saline for eyes and skin irrigation.
Know absolutely how you will get serious cases taken to higher levels of care, no "single combat with Death" deals; have phone numbers or radio freqs, know and maybe mark the route, go see the ER and EMS responders and maybe write them to set an appt and go meet them, see their stuff and talk over what they can and want to offer, hostoric responses there, etc.
DO NOT let your sponsoring organization suck you into doing too much or doing risky stuff. DO NOT let yourself become tied up in ancillary activities so you are not available. I would not advertise that I was carrying OTC's, try to get folks to bring their own and encourage them nt to come if they are hurt or sick. Tell folks to wash their hands, stay on the paths and drink fluids.
Bring an ice chest and fill it with ice (from the dining hall?) each AM. Bring sandwich baggies to make ice paks with.
Be sure you are familiar with your working facility, get there early , make saure it is clean and kept that way.

I've done this for military and Girl Scouts, message me if you want. We have others as well.
 

frdude1000

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I do a lot of standby ems, and I just did a standby in a state park in a cabin. You should def. have a backboard and straps and oxygen if you are in the park. It is a good idea to have ice and baggies, there will be a lot of bumps and bruises. If you can, you might want to acquire an epi pen if the ALS response time is long and if your protocols permit.
 

MedicSqrl

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I do a lot of standby ems, and I just did a standby in a state park in a cabin. You should def. have a backboard and straps and oxygen if you are in the park. It is a good idea to have ice and baggies, there will be a lot of bumps and bruises. If you can, you might want to acquire an epi pen if the ALS response time is long and if your protocols permit.
Luckily most people that need a epi-pen, let us know they already have one just incase. I've seen on the FL DOH site that there is a Emergency Sting Cert which allows you to carry an epi-pen to use on others.
 

Veneficus

Forum Chief
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I work a festival at the Ocala National forest in Florida. Its held once in the summer and winter. My group is mostly FR's with one or two EMT's/PM's. As of now our first aid supplies are mostly donated so we get a lot of random things and trying to get it organized is a hassle. I wanted to post a list of things I have complied so far. These supplies need to service a 300+ person festival. For the most part we have have a cabin where most of the first aid happens. There is also tent near the vendors area where people can take simple supplies like aspirin and band-aids. Finally there is a golf cart with some things to respond to incidents. This is a complete list of everything I would need, then I would have to decide what amounts of which go in to each area. So any suggestions on what more I could use and what to put in where is appreciated. Thanks for all the suggestions in advance.



Trauma/Wound Care
Plastic bandages you will need a lot of these for blister care
Fabric bandages one or the other, not both, most people take them off as "unsightly" anyway
Knuckle bandages wouldn't bother
Fingertip bandages wouldn't bother
Elbow & knee plastic bandages Just go with the large ones and use scissors to cut them as needed
Medium butterfly wound closures of no use, if you are closing wounds they may need stitching
2" x 2" Sterile Dressing
3"x3" Sterile Dressing
4" x 4" Sterile Dressing just use these and cut as needed
Super Stop bandage waste, just use 4 x 4
2" Kling will come in handy
Triangular sling/bandage no use
Cohesive elastic bandage wrap no use
Cold packs ice and baggies are much cheaper.
Sam "Splints" not needed

OTC Meds
Antacid tablets
Advil
Extra-strength Advil I'd go with fem releif, or some other menstrual OTC, they are usually an aspirin/tylenol mix and work great
Aspirin

Anti-Diarrhea tablets liquid gets you more miles
Benadryl good idea

Cleaning/Itching/Burning
Alcohol wipes this will probably take the place of the next 3 items
Antiseptic cleansing wipes (Sting Free) waste
Antiseptic spray more waste, soap and water
Triple antibiotic ointment packs more waste
Hydrocortisone cream if you must
Insect Bite Wipes alcohol
Insect Repellent make people bring thier own, you will never have enough
Iodine infection control wipes why?
Spray on bandage these burn like hell when not used with lido they also cost a lot
Burn relief packs Ice
Burn spray make sure it is 0.5 lidocaine, it makes a great pain killer for cuts, blisters, and prior to spray on bandage
Poison Ivy/etc Cream good idea
Sun Screen you'll go broke supplying this make people bring thier own
Burn Kit waste of money
Snake/Bee kit meat tenderizer works wonders

Misc/Special
Tape
Moleskin
Eye Pads
Eye wash
Eye Drops
CPR Mask
Q-tips
Gloves S/M/L
Scissors
Tweezers
Tampons/Pads
Bio bags
Sharps box
thermometer
all these are good except maybe the moleskin.

Just my experience and opinion
 

ExpatMedic0

MS, NRP
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I would also include some basic airway and cpr stuff, like a face mask at the very least but it would be ideal to have a BVM and OPA's.

Also some PPE like gloves and eye protection

Also coband and or ace wrap's

I have been doing stand by's for 5 years, most of the time you get blisters, band-aid request, head aches, upset stomach and sprained ankles. However, every 10-20 calls I get a serious call that requires 911 so be prepared to atleast have the bare minimum to manage ABC's at a BLS level and have the proper PPE to protect yourself. Because something will happen one day

Sorry if I mentioned something that was all ready on there I overlooked
oh and the moleskin is a great idea... When I was in the Army it was our most used item on road marches (hikes)
 
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ryujinn

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I've done something similar for a festival a while back..

We contacted local city EMS to tell us we had first responders (EMT's there). .
I was sponsored equipment by my company (backboard and first aid).

It went pretty well :) Members feel a lot safer knowing there is standby there, since it gets crowded and EMS would take a bit longer to weave through traffic and people. Plus, because we are ethnically related to the majority of the people at the festival, we can translate and transfer care.

My question is to the above posters though..

How does this work legally? I did some research and talked to some legal aides. But wanted the opinion of others. No ricky rescue type of stuff.. Just trying to provide better care in a setting where english is not spoken too much.

Does the good sam law protect us because we are non-paid volunteers acting in best interest? How does carrying an AED/o2 tank work?

Yup!

Thanks!

P.S. Sorry to detract from OP .. Your items seem solid. I believe having a backboard is useful too if someone was in an uncompromising situation. C-collar could help too. It seems oxygen seems very beneficial for the young ones and elderly people. But I don't know because don't people argue that it is medication? Well, this is a volunteering setting - so can we classify it as emergency oxygen and not have a Rx? Don't know.

Do you also have identifiable uniforms? We wore reflector vests that were blue..
 
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Veneficus

Forum Chief
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I've done something similar for a festival a while back..

We contacted local city EMS to tell us we had first responders (EMT's there). .
I was sponsored equipment by my company (backboard and first aid).

It went pretty well :) Members feel a lot safer knowing there is standby there, since it gets crowded and EMS would take a bit longer to weave through traffic and people. Plus, because we are ethnically related to the majority of the people at the festival, we can translate and transfer care.

My question is to the above posters though..

How does this work legally? I did some research and talked to some legal aides. But wanted the opinion of others. No ricky rescue type of stuff.. Just trying to provide better care in a setting where english is not spoken too much.

Does the good sam law protect us because we are non-paid volunteers acting in best interest? How does carrying an AED/o2 tank work?

Yup!

Thanks!

P.S. Sorry to detract from OP .. Your items seem solid. I believe having a backboard is useful too if someone was in an uncompromising situation. C-collar could help too. It seems oxygen seems very beneficial for the young ones and elderly people. But I don't know because don't people argue that it is medication? Well, this is a volunteering setting - so can we classify it as emergency oxygen and not have a Rx? Don't know.

Do you also have identifiable uniforms? We wore reflector vests that were blue..

I have always worked under medical direction, it was an expanded scope in addition to regular emergency duties.

I imagine it depends on the state and what you are doing, but unless there is an official who legally overseeing what I am doing, I do not get involved.

I am not a legal expert, but if you are billing yourself as a "first aid" or "medical service" I don't think good sam would apply, especially if you are dispensing.
 

mycrofft

Still crazy but elsewhere
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Ix-nay the ineboard-spay...maybe-ay.

Spinal packaging is not a treatment, it is preparation for transport. If you can, leave the spinal immobilization packaging to the transporters and extricators. Maybe a C collar deal for potential C spine and coincidental need for ventilation or CPR, maybe a spineboard/KED/collar for movement or extrication due to immediate danger, but I hated the few times I came on scene and someone had put on a spinal packaging...especially when the pt was cursing and fighting the straps.

Good Samaritan applies to incidental care (you drive by); if you are "retained", even if only by your word ("I'll be your first aid standby"), you have a duty to act and the Good Sam no longer applies.

None of us have mentioned having a means to record treatment for your records, the sponsor organization's records, and for youjr patients. A legible sign in log should suffice for you and your sponsor (Name, age, date of birth, time in, complaint and disposition,time out), and a means of passing care to their MD or walk in clinic (name, DOB, time in, complaint, treatment, notes, your signature and phone number).
 
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reidnez

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Sorry to divert the thread, but I'm just wondering...where does one find these kinds of jobs? I am still in school full-time for the next few months but I want to do some part-time EMT work (even volunteer is OK, it's the experience I'm after), this seems like a perfect fit. So where do I find the jobs?
 

mycrofft

Still crazy but elsewhere
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Join or contact organizations that do these things.

Fortunately or unfortunately most are staffed from personal contacts or members.

Try this?

http://www.rockmedicine.org/




 

LucidResq

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I've done search and rescue for about 3 years, worked an ALS first aid service at an amusement/water park last season for about 6 mo. and have worked a bunch of various marathons and other events.

Having a splinter kit at the amusement park was AWESOME. They come with tweezers and this little tool to push up the head of the splinter.... works like a charm.

Bandaids, bandaids, bandaids. Plenty of tape, gauze and tegaderm or what not. I learned to be VERY creative with my bandaging.

Heat packs are useful for certain strains. We'd use them a lot at the amusement park for people who had minor whiplash soreness from the rollercoasters and such. We'd simply take expired bags of NS and heat them in the microwave for a bit.

We used quite a bit of those benzocaine-based insect sting relief wipes, creams and liquids.

Lots of ice and water.

Extra shirts and random clothing items are nice when people ruin their own with vomit, blood or what-not. Not a necessity, but a nice "customer service" thing.
 

LucidResq

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Bring an ice chest and fill it with ice (from the dining hall?) each AM. Bring sandwich baggies to make ice paks with.
+++

Also, if you can, have some kind of drinking water available in your cabin/tent and encourage everyone to have some, including patients, visitors, anyone who wanders in. Encourage them to come back if they need more, fill their water bottles etc. Good preventative medicine.

Whether marathon, event, or amusement park, the vast majority of patients I've seen who require more care than cleaning up a boo-boo were syncopals due to lack of water & food.
 

Akulahawk

EMT-P/ED RN
Community Leader
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My thoughts in-line, based on my experience as well...
I work a festival at the Ocala National forest in Florida. Its held once in the summer and winter. My group is mostly FR's with one or two EMT's/PM's. As of now our first aid supplies are mostly donated so we get a lot of random things and trying to get it organized is a hassle. I wanted to post a list of things I have complied so far. These supplies need to service a 300+ person festival. For the most part we have have a cabin where most of the first aid happens. There is also tent near the vendors area where people can take simple supplies like aspirin and band-aids. Finally there is a golf cart with some things to respond to incidents. This is a complete list of everything I would need, then I would have to decide what amounts of which go in to each area. So any suggestions on what more I could use and what to put in where is appreciated. Thanks for all the suggestions in advance.



Trauma/Wound Care
Plastic bandages choose plastic or fabric. Either will work well.
Fabric bandages
Knuckle bandages don't bother.
Fingertip bandages don't bother
Elbow & knee plastic bandages use tape & 4x4 gauze to create these.
Medium butterfly wound closures if you're using these, they're likely needing sutures anyway.
2" x 2" Sterile Dressing good
3"x3" Sterile Dressing don't bother. just use a 4x4 if you need a larger size.
4" x 4" Sterile Dressing good
same 2x2/4x4 in a non-sterile version.
Super Stop bandage don't bother.
2" Kling useful stuff
Triangular sling/bandage while you might bring one with you, don't expect to use it.
Cohesive elastic bandage wrap whether or not I'd pack them depends upon the activities the participants are expecting to do...
Cold packs - you might bring a couple... making ice bags on the fly is as good and cheaper.
Sam "Splints" never needed one. while you might consider having one available, don't expect to use it.

OTC Meds
Antacid tablets not a bad idea.
Advil these work.
Extra-strength Advil don't bother.
Aspirin 81mg chewables? Otherwise, Supac or other generic tylenol/aspirin/caffeine (sounds exactly like excedrin, doesn't it...) works.
Anti-Diarrhea tablets liquid stuff works pretty well.
Benadryl not a bad idea.

Cleaning/Itching/Burning
Alcohol wipes not a bad idea.
Antiseptic cleansing wipes (Sting Free) don't bother.
Antiseptic spray don't bother.
Triple antibiotic ointment packs these can be a good idea, but it depends upon the expected activities.
Hydrocortisone cream this would be in the "maybe" category.
Insect Bite Wipes wouldn't bother.
Insect Repellent bring some for yourself. otherwise, they should be on their own...
Iodine infection control wipes wouldn't bother.
Spray on bandage stings like crazy unless used with lido... wouldn't bother, personally.
Burn relief packs wouldn't bother...
Burn spray if it has lido in it, it'll help soothe sunburn... but I suggest aloe vera...
Poison Ivy/etc Cream not a bad idea, but know the area. you may/may not need it.
Sun Screen bring some for yourself, and perhaps some packets... don't advertise these.
Burn Kit depends if you think you're going to be working on major burns... otherwise, just keep the area clean and call for early transport...
Snake/Bee kit meat tenderizer stuff works pretty well.

Misc/Special
Tape depends upon sizes, type, brand.
Moleskin useful under certain circumstances...
Eye Pads bring some. expect that your other bandaging material gets used for this anyway.
Eye wash bring lots of this stuff...
Eye Drops bring lots of this stuff, single use containers...
CPR Mask
Q-tips
Gloves S/M/L whatever you need to wear... and a few extras just in case...
Scissors
Tweezers
Tampons/Pads
Bio bags
Sharps box
thermometer
Second Skin... if you know how to use this stuff, it's GREAT for blisters...
And there you have it...
 

mycrofft

Still crazy but elsewhere
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Ah, the Shark comes out again!

AND Lucid is right on as well.
 

Akulahawk

EMT-P/ED RN
Community Leader
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Indeed Lucid makes a GREAT point to remind us to remind people to eat and drink while out and about...


PS: I do try to pop in every now and again...
 

MedicSqrl

Forum Crew Member
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Now I see alot of people discarding the anti-septic wipes/spray, but what would you use to clean the wound if soap and water isn't available?
 

Akulahawk

EMT-P/ED RN
Community Leader
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Did you notice that I said you should bring lots of eye wash? Wet down the area with the eye wash and a clean gauze pad, scrub... rinse & repeat PRN until clean. Use this during those times when you absolutely do NOT have enough soap & water handy. Antiseptic wipes and sprays won't really help you clean/debride wounds.
 
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