CA DMV Ambulance Driver's Test Feedback, June, 2017

Califteacher

Forum Ride Along
5
2
3
I just took and passed on my first attempt the DMV test for the CA Ambulance Driver Certificate. Like many others, I went online for information on what to study. I felt the Ambulance Driver's Handbook that DMV sells for $5 was overly complicated. Therefore, I want to offer some guidance and encouragement to those following behind me.

Being a retired educator and someone who came in first in my EMT class, I found studying for the DMV test frustrating, as it wasn’t clear what material was going to be tested. The handbook from DMV seemed centered on government regulations pertaining as much to ambulance service owners as drivers. Some of the flashcards found online ventured into braking and passing distances not covered on the test. The AMR sample test found online was helpful, but only in a general sense.

The bottom line is that your success on the test will come from studying the DMV Ambulance Drivers Handbook from cover to cover, page by page. I spent 6-8 hours, over several days, studying for the test, and read the handbook a half dozen times, carefully highlighting as I went. There are items I only noticed after several readings.

After I took the test, I was able to go back and identify about 22 of 30 questions that came right from the handbook. Most of the questions I had highlighted, but there were a couple that I had simply overlooked. Although there were questions from ALL CHAPTERS, Chapter 3 is your best friend, containing at least 12 questions. I didn’t go online to research any of the government references listed in the back of the handbook, but this might be helpful, as well.

Frankly, I would avoid most of the online flashcards. I didn’t find them helpful and they went in directions that are not covered by the test. There were no questions about the types of sirens, braking distances, or elements of defensive driving.

The AMR practice test found online was helpful in suggesting the type of questions one will encounter, but I only identified 12 of 30 questions that are still on the DMV test, so don’t rely on this resource too much.

The DMV test was an untimed, paper and pencil, multiple-choice format, with three possible answers for each question. Most were pretty straightforward, but a few left me scratching my head. Despite my preparation, I missed three questions (one can miss four and pass, I believe). One question I had overlooked in the handbook, while the other two were simply judgment calls on information that was not in the handbook (maybe they are covered in some of the referenced regulations).

Make sure that you have all your required paperwork when going to DMV—driver’s license, EMT card, completed fingerprint paperwork, and all of your completed medical exam paperwork (the detailed exam results were reviewed, item by item, by the clerk). The actual Ambulance Drivers Certificate application form is filled out at the DMV office. You will have a photo taken, so don’t go on a bad hair day. The DMV charge was $25 (no credit cards accepted).

Yes, I know that there are individuals who have passed the DMV test on the fly, without studying, but this post isn’t for them. My intent is to encourage those who find some of this overwhelming or are new to the field. After reading posts that said, “most don’t pass the test on their first try,” I felt pretty intimidated while preparing for the test, but you can do it—it is just going to take time and effort on your part. I hope this has helped. Good Luck!
 

DesertMedic66

Forum Troll
10,092
2,501
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You are probably one of the only people who has actually used the book to study for that test. I bought the book and read maybe 2 pages before I said "screw this". I turned to google and at least the sites I used all had the exact DMV questions and passed first try with no issues.

Now when I have to renew it I just walk in and blindly take the test. You have 3 tries before you have to pay again and it's really not a hard test.
 

CALEMT

The Other Guy/ Paramaybe?
3,399
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You are probably one of the only people who has actually used the book to study for that test.
I honestly didn't know there was a book until I re-certified. Honestly it's just common sense plus you get 3 tries.
 

Tony Maximilian

Eternal Optimist
38
13
8
I just took and passed on my first attempt the DMV test for the CA Ambulance Driver Certificate. Like many others, I went online for information on what to study. I felt the Ambulance Driver's Handbook that DMV sells for $5 was overly complicated. Therefore, I want to offer some guidance and encouragement to those following behind me.

Being a retired educator and someone who came in first in my EMT class, I found studying for the DMV test frustrating, as it wasn’t clear what material was going to be tested. The handbook from DMV seemed centered on government regulations pertaining as much to ambulance service owners as drivers. Some of the flashcards found online ventured into braking and passing distances not covered on the test. The AMR sample test found online was helpful, but only in a general sense.

The bottom line is that your success on the test will come from studying the DMV Ambulance Drivers Handbook from cover to cover, page by page. I spent 6-8 hours, over several days, studying for the test, and read the handbook a half dozen times, carefully highlighting as I went. There are items I only noticed after several readings.

After I took the test, I was able to go back and identify about 22 of 30 questions that came right from the handbook. Most of the questions I had highlighted, but there were a couple that I had simply overlooked. Although there were questions from ALL CHAPTERS, Chapter 3 is your best friend, containing at least 12 questions. I didn’t go online to research any of the government references listed in the back of the handbook, but this might be helpful, as well.

Frankly, I would avoid most of the online flashcards. I didn’t find them helpful and they went in directions that are not covered by the test. There were no questions about the types of sirens, braking distances, or elements of defensive driving.

The AMR practice test found online was helpful in suggesting the type of questions one will encounter, but I only identified 12 of 30 questions that are still on the DMV test, so don’t rely on this resource too much.

The DMV test was an untimed, paper and pencil, multiple-choice format, with three possible answers for each question. Most were pretty straightforward, but a few left me scratching my head. Despite my preparation, I missed three questions (one can miss four and pass, I believe). One question I had overlooked in the handbook, while the other two were simply judgment calls on information that was not in the handbook (maybe they are covered in some of the referenced regulations).

Make sure that you have all your required paperwork when going to DMV—driver’s license, EMT card, completed fingerprint paperwork, and all of your completed medical exam paperwork (the detailed exam results were reviewed, item by item, by the clerk). The actual Ambulance Drivers Certificate application form is filled out at the DMV office. You will have a photo taken, so don’t go on a bad hair day. The DMV charge was $25 (no credit cards accepted).

Yes, I know that there are individuals who have passed the DMV test on the fly, without studying, but this post isn’t for them. My intent is to encourage those who find some of this overwhelming or are new to the field. After reading posts that said, “most don’t pass the test on their first try,” I felt pretty intimidated while preparing for the test, but you can do it—it is just going to take time and effort on your part. I hope this has helped. Good Luck!
Useful info. Thanks!
 

VentMonkey

calpuleque
Premium Member
4,501
3,584
113
@DesertMedic66, and @CALEMT AMR doesn't give you guys their "study sheet" anymore?

They used to provide it for us at orientation and say: "Here, study this before you take the exam, and you'll do fine."

#OldFogie
#ModernTechnology
#GodBlessTheInterwebs
 

DesertMedic66

Forum Troll
10,092
2,501
113
@DesertMedic66, and @CALEMT AMR doesn't give you guys their "study sheet" anymore?

They used to provide it for us at orientation and say: "Here, study this before you take the exam, and you'll do fine."

#OldFogie
#ModernTechnology
#GodBlessTheInterwebs
The ambulance license was required in order to apply for AMR for me.
 

Qulevrius

Nationally Certified Wannabe
829
432
63
Honestly it's just common sense plus you get 3 tries.
^This. Take the test, if you pass = good, if not = they show you the mistakes and give you another one. It's pretty damn hard to miss the same question twice within a 5 min timespan. I had to recert this year and "passed" on a 2nd try (made 1 mistake too many on my 1st go). Studying for it, seriously...?
 

Valeriee

Forum Ride Along
1
0
1
You are probably one of the only people who has actually used the book to study for that test. I bought the book and read maybe 2 pages before I said "screw this". I turned to google and at least the sites I used all had the exact DMV questions and passed first try with no issues.

Now when I have to renew it I just walk in and blindly take the test. You have 3 tries before you have to pay again and it's really not a hard test.
What sites did you use that had the dmv questions ?
 

CALEMT

The Other Guy/ Paramaybe?
3,399
2,319
113
What sites did you use that had the dmv questions ?
You get 3 tries. You can literally walk in without studying and walk out with your ambulance driver cert.
 
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