B to P, timeline??

JWalters

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Here in MA I have found several Paramedic programs, and one of them (out of 7 or 8) says that you need to be a working EMT for one year before you can begin the program. The others have no time line requirement, simply that you must be a certified EMT-B before the start of the training (with the exception of one, which is at a private college and takes you from layperson to EMT to P all in the same training...anyway, I'm digressing).

What has your experience been with the length of time you stayed a B before moving on? I personally don't see the point in delaying education but was wondering if the additional ride time and exposure as a B was helpful. My thoughts are that I am going be working as a B the whole time in training still anyways.
 

TransportJockey

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I spent two years as a basic, 2.5 as an Intermediate of various levels before I became a medic. I wish I had kept it up and just gone straight from B-P. The experience was nice, but a good program should turn you out as an entry level medic comparable to any other parapup out there. I know one school in NM that does from layperson to EMT-P in 4 years culminating in a BS-EMS degree, which is what I wish was the standard nationwide.
 

MrJones

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I spent two years as a basic, 2.5 as an Intermediate of various levels before I became a medic. I wish I had kept it up and just gone straight from B-P. The experience was nice, but a good program should turn you out as an entry level medic comparable to any other parapup out there. I know one school in NM that does from layperson to EMT-P in 4 years culminating in a BS-EMS degree, which is what I wish was the standard nationwide.

Eastern Kentucky (my alma mater) has the same type of program. You can start as a layperson and attend for 2 years and earn an Associates of Science in Paramedicine (and qualify to sit for NREMT testing) or go 4 for a Bachelors with an emphasis in science (the track most who plan to go on to BSN/PA/MD/etc take), clinical (more for those planning on being a career medic) or administration. I was an EMT when I started, and chose to work as an EMT during the program so that I'd be able to focus on learning my medic skills during ride time, but most students earn their EMT through the program and many chose to not work in the field during training.
 

TransportJockey

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Eastern Kentucky (my alma mater) has the same type of program. You can start as a layperson and attend for 2 years and earn an Associates of Science in Paramedicine (and qualify to sit for NREMT testing) or go 4 for a Bachelors with an emphasis in science (the track most who plan to go on to BSN/PA/MD/etc take), clinical (more for those planning on being a career medic) or administration. I was an EMT when I started, and chose to work as an EMT during the program so that I'd be able to focus on learning my medic skills during ride time, but most students earn their EMT through the program and many chose to not work in the field during training.
I'll most likely transfer to IBM once I finish my associates in the spring so I can finish my bachelor's through them. I like the idea of programs like that
 

Medic Tim

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I went straight to EMT intermediate . Worked as one in the USA and Canada (primary care paramedic) for 3 years before getting an AAS EMS degree.

The paramedic program I did had a mix of no experience , some as a basic and some as an intermediate.
The no experience guys did better than the current basics. The current basics had a hard time adapting . the intermediates did quite will and we had all wishes we had done medic sooner.
 

MrJones

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Forgot to mention one other option at EKU that you fire types might like - You can get a BS in Fire Science w/ a minor in Paramedicine and be able to sit for the NREMT exam.
 
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JWalters

Forum Crew Member
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I went straight to EMT intermediate . Worked as one in the USA and Canada (primary care paramedic) for 3 years before getting an AAS EMS degree.

The paramedic program I did had a mix of no experience , some as a basic and some as an intermediate.
The no experience guys did better than the current basics. The current basics had a hard time adapting . the intermediates did quite will and we had all wishes we had done medic sooner.

Yes, this is what I was thinking. Although I personally think that it is never too early for more education, I was looking for input because I simply don't know the field well enough to make a truly informed decision. It did occur to me, though, that the longer I worked as a B the more bad habits I would pick up, thus making it harder to adapt.
 

J B

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I started medic school before I got my first EMT-b job. Worked throughout school, and I expect to do just fine. I think the knowledge you gain during medic school helps you take more away from your experience as a basic. I do think it's fairly important to get SOME experience at some point before you go out into the field as a medic (mainly so you can learn to drive and not make an idiot of yourself over the radio / when giving reports), but I'm not sold on the idea that it takes 3+ years to get a good handle on the job of an EMT-B (3 total years as a basic if you work for 1 year, then start medic school and work during school).

People tend to resent medics without lots of basic experience, so don't let people know you're in medic school until you're reasonably competent as an EMT.
 

PirateMedic3

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Eastern Kentucky (my alma mater) has the same type of program. You can start as a layperson and attend for 2 years and earn an Associates of Science in Paramedicine (and qualify to sit for NREMT testing) or go 4 for a Bachelors with an emphasis in science (the track most who plan to go on to BSN/PA/MD/etc take), clinical (more for those planning on being a career medic) or administration. I was an EMT when I started, and chose to work as an EMT during the program so that I'd be able to focus on learning my medic skills during ride time, but most students earn their EMT through the program and many chose to not work in the field during training.

Did you obtain of BS of EMS Administration from EKU?
 

Summit

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I don't see much reason to wait. As soon as you get your EMT, start prereqs for P while working as an EMT and then enter a good P school as soon as your prereqs are done.

Keep in mind some schools with experience requirements may have their curriculum based on that assumption. (Elsewhere in healthcare this quite true)

Anyone who says you need more than a year's experience is full of it.
 

MackTheKnife

BSN, RN-BC, EMT-P, TCRN, CEN
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I spent two years as a basic, 2.5 as an Intermediate of various levels before I became a medic. I wish I had kept it up and just gone straight from B-P. The experience was nice, but a good program should turn you out as an entry level medic comparable to any other parapup out there. I know one school in NM that does from layperson to EMT-P in 4 years culminating in a BS-EMS degree, which is what I wish was the standard nationwide.
4 yrs? I see it awards a Bachelor's, but 4 years to become a PM? Too long.

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TransportJockey

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4 yrs? I see it awards a Bachelor's, but 4 years to become a PM? Too long.

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It's a four year bachelors. That includes all the prereqs and some advanced classes along with the ability to follow one of three or four speciality tracks (austere medicine, mgmt, critical care, etc) which is done in your last year
 

Medic Tim

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It's a four year bachelors. That includes all the prereqs and some advanced classes along with the ability to follow one of three or four speciality tracks (austere medicine, mgmt, critical care, etc) which is done in your last year
Sounds like a great program.
We have a handful north of the border. Should be more popping up as there is a push for a bachelors degree entry practice paramedic by 2025.


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TransportJockey

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Sounds like a great program.
We have a handful north of the border. Should be more popping up as there is a push for a bachelors degree entry practice paramedic by 2025.


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I really wish I had the ability to work in Canada... But I'd miss my beach too much too lol
 

Medic Tim

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I really wish I had the ability to work in Canada... But I'd miss my beach too much too lol
My cross shift used to live in key west. He may be moving to the Caribbean soon. 2 weeks on 2 weeks off. Company pays for travel and accommodation .
Not a bad gig at all.


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NomadicMedic

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My wife is from Canada. She wants to move back. I may actaully have to seriously investigate the reciprocity thing.
 

Medic Tim

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My wife is from Canada. She wants to move back. I may actaully have to seriously investigate the reciprocity thing.
I believe British Columbia accepts NRP. Nova Scotia used to... Not sure if they still do. They were revamping the process when I was licensing.


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NomadicMedic

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I believe British Columbia accepts NRP. Nova Scotia used to... Not sure if they still do. They were revamping the process when I was licensing.

It would be NS, if it were anywhere up there. She's from Cape Bretton and from what I understand, NRP is still accecpted.
 

Medic Tim

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It would be NS, if it were anywhere up there. She's from Cape Bretton and from what I understand, NRP is still accecpted.
Most of the ALS medics where I work live on the east coast.... Mostly in NS.


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