Aspiring EMT student

EMTrigger

Forum Probie
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Just went on my first ride along. I gotta say it was exciting. Got to see everything from assisted living and serious trauma patients. There won't be an EMT-B class until the summmer and I can't ride along again until the volunteer ambulance associated votes me in as a member. I don't want to wait until the summer to start learning.

Can anyone give me any suggestions to EMT textbooks????
 

emtkelley

Forum Crew Member
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Find out what text you will be using and buy them now. Just don't get to absorbed with it. Look them over and do some light reading here and there.

In your enthusiasm, don't get burnt out. Remember there are other interests and other activities outside of EMS. You don't want to be mentally fried before you even walk through your classroom door this summer. Good luck!
 

Ridryder911

EMS Guru
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Chill out.. glad your interested in EMS but you only seen the "good points". Remember it is a job (paid or professional) and like other jobs, it has its bad points. Be sure to talk to those involved to be fully aware before enrolling into a course. There are a many that enter and very few that actually work in EMS.

Instead of getting an EMT book, take an anatomy class or medical terminology course, or something similar. This will help prepare you far more than reading an EMT book before a course.

Remember, there will be an EMS when you enter into the EMT class and finish it. Study hard, read a lot, and practice skills hard and pay attention on clinicals.

Good luck,
R/r 911
 

BossyCow

Forum Deputy Chief
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Instead of getting an EMT book, take an anatomy class or medical terminology course, or something similar. This will help prepare you far more than reading an EMT book before a course.
Absolutely, both will also make the reading of most EMS texts go a lot smoother because you have an idea of the territory.

I've found that one of the best ways to learn is to make your knowledge incident specific. Instead of beginning by memorizing an entire body of knowledge when you encounter something on a ride along or a call, read up on that particular situation, Respiratory Distress, Trauma, CHF... that way the info you get has a nice sticky place in your brain to be retained.
 

ReebTop

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When going through the class, I found it was very beneficial to make a crib sheet of a bunch of rote memorization stuff, like average ranges for blood pressures/pulse rates/respirations, write out in full the common mnemonics (SAMPLE, OPQRST) and basically anything you find the instructors really hammering into you. It's a hell of lot easier than digging through pages of notes.

Not that you shouldn't take said pages of notes. Because 1) it seems to be a great help, at least for me, in remembering things if I write them out longhand and 2) if I had to do it, so does everyone else :angry:

Also, once you get through it, keep a level head. Don't let it rule your life. Try to have some stories to tell that don't start with, "Well, last night at work/the squad..." and almost everything will be sunshine and rainbows.
 

Fire219man

Forum Crew Member
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I am in EMS Class now...Brady is whom made my book....I agree with flash cards, they help out greatly..
 

Recycled Words

Forum Crew Member
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We used the AAOS textbook and whether or not it's the textbook you use, the resources on this site are incredibly helpful:
http://www.emtb.com/9e/

Before the course starts, you could use the Anatomy Review and Vocabulary Explorer. Once you're in the course, the Chapter Pretests and Interactivities are immensly helpful. [All links are on the vertical blue bar on the left side of the screen]
 

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