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Anything you wish you knew before starting Field Training?

Discussion in 'EMS Lounge' started by Foxem, May 15, 2018.

  1. Foxem

    Foxem Forum Probie

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    I'll be getting my FTO assigned to me here shortly and I wanted to know if there was any advice you guys could give me that might not be to obvious; or anything you would have done differently. As of right now, I'm just going into it with an open mind and a few hours of studying my response area. I know I won't be an expert at anything by any means, but any tips would be appreciated. Thanks guys!
     
  2. DrParasite

    DrParasite The fire extinguisher is not just for show

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    you don't know anything. let them show you everything. do whatever they say, even if you know a better way. Don't question anything, they are the FTO, so whatever they say gooes. They know all, and you need their approval to get released to practice. Once you get cleared, than you can function as an EMT.

    Accept that there are some really bad FTOs in EMS; do whatever you need to do in order to complete your FTO time
     
    Gurby likes this.
  3. mgr22

    mgr22 Forum Asst. Chief

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    I agree with DrParasite. I'll just add that you're expected to know the classroom basics, so it's ok to start by doing things the way you were taught. Just be ready and willing to adjust from the way you think things ought to be to the way things really are at your job.
     
  4. Lo2w

    Lo2w Forum Captain

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    Don't get lost, at least have a good idea of the major routes, how to get to your hospitals etc.

    "I know I can take x north and y east to get to this call, is there a better route you prefer?"

    I'd talk to them before the start of shift, get a feel for how they like to run calls and identify things you feel you need to work on.
     
  5. Gurby

    Gurby Forum Asst. Chief

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    Is this 911, IFT or a mix?
     
  6. Foxem

    Foxem Forum Probie

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    Its 911. My first shift is at night as well. Not sure if that's makes it more or less difficult than the day. No traffic should be nice though.

    I've been studying maps all day, thank you!
     
  7. Lo2w

    Lo2w Forum Captain

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    I moved for my 911 and luckily I'm good at reading maps and orienting myself. If you've got a good sense of direction and know pretty much how the streets run in your area it's pretty easy once you get some time in.

    A big one will be knowing where you can pick up the freeways if you use them to access hospitals.
     
  8. Gurby

    Gurby Forum Asst. Chief

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    First time on an ambulance and you're jumping in the deep end! :p

    Just be honest if you can't hear the BP. 2 hands on the stretcher at all times.
     
    Lo2w likes this.
  9. Lo2w

    Lo2w Forum Captain

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    If you can't hear the BP try to palpate one before admitting defeat.
     
    Gurby likes this.
  10. Foxem

    Foxem Forum Probie

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    I appreciated all the advice guys, the first shift went swimmingly!
     
  11. medichopeful

    medichopeful NRP, ICU RN, CCRN, CEN

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    I think it’s important to question your FTO if they are doing something you don’t understand, or is questionable. However, it’s best to do this in private.

    The one exception is a safety issue. Speak up if there is a chance someone can get hurt.
     
    Lo2w likes this.

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