A Funny Thing Happened... (circle one)

rescuecpt

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I have a story that doesn't really deserve its own thread, but I wanted to share, so I thought we could start a thread for similar funny/interesting situations and just keep them all in one place.


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Today I responded to a single car MVA. I managed to have blood soak through my turnout and onto my jeans. So at the hospital I asked for scrubs to change into so I could get cleaned up. Well, they're tired of handing out scrubs and never getting them back, so I was given a pair of PAPER scrubs. Kinda like the material they make the "bibs" out of at the dentist's office. It's about 20 degrees here. I walk out of the ER doors, and I'm hit by a nice gust of wind - and I immediately say "WHOA it's COLD in PAPER PANTS"... to which my crew practically fell to the floor because they were laughing so hard. The ER only had XL - I had them tied as tight as possible, up around my ribs, and I had to grab the legs and yank them up so I wouldn't trip. <_<
 

Wingnut

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LMAO! :lol:
 

Chimpie

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Time to throw a set of scrubs on the bus with you when you start a shift? I thought about buying a set or two just in case something like that happened to me.
 

MMiz

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LOL!

I'm only provided one pair of pants and two shirts. When I worked a large MVC I was covered from head to toe in mud. My supervisor literally took a hose, washed me off, and I worked the remaining 8 or so hours soaking wet. Remember that we sit in our ambulances to post. It was the worst feeling ever.

I'm always tempted to buy an extra pair of pants, but I never do. Hmmm.
 

rescuecpt

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When I got back to HQ I treated & washed my pants in the washer/dryer there. I was also given a new jumpsuit. Luckily I had extra jeans with me because I was planning on going somewhere straight after my shift and I covered myself for the just-in-case which actually happened. First time in 5 years there was enough blood to go through my gear.
 

Wingnut

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Not to get off topic, these stories are hilarious...but...
You guys have a special soap for that or do you use the bleach solution?

I ask because my husband gets blood on his uniform sometimes and the bleach will obviously ruin it if I do it much longer.
 

rescuecpt

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I mixed bleach with regular detergent and used a small brush to scrub a little bit into the bloody areas - then rinsed it out and applied plain detergent to the spots and let it sit a few minutes before throwing the whole thing in the wash. It seemed to have worked pretty well. I wore gloves during this - remember Hepatitis has been found to live for 30 days in dried blood (sheesh!!!).
 

Wingnut

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Lovely <_<


I do the same to his uniforms, I just hate to have to replace them because of bleach stains.
 

rescuecpt

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Originally posted by Wingnut@Feb 20 2005, 01:24 PM
Lovely <_<


I do the same to his uniforms, I just hate to have to replace them because of bleach stains.
Have you tried the "colorsafe" bleach?
 

Wingnut

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No, lol I buy the cheapest stuff on the shelves...I guess it's time to upgrade :)
 

cbdemt

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Thought I'd share a trick that my mom taught me. (Insert momma's boy comment here) Hydrogen Peroxide will take out most any organic stain ie: blood or grass. Obviously it wont disinfect, so a little bleach wont hurt either, but the peroxide is much more colorsafe than any bleach when you're scrubbing. Thats my Martha Stewart post for the day :)
 

Wingnut

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LOL, you just reminded me of something stupid I did once. Lets just say it involved a home made bellybutton peircing, hair and hydrogen peroxide. It actually bleached the hair, grant it not as bad as bleach would have but enough to freak me out. I'm not so sure it would be any safer than bleach.?




Oh yeah.....Mama's Boy!!!!!!!! :lol:
 

emtbuff

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I have to back up cbdemt with the comment about using hydrogen peroxide as I my self have used it to get blood out of pants and t-shirts before. Most of the time my own blood but it does work and works well. Just make sure that you then follow up with extra cleaning in the wash machine.
 

Jon

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How about red PAINT? any suggestions?

Jon
 

Wingnut

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LOL...turpentine!!!! :lol:
 

SafetyPro2

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Going back to the pants issue, we keep a spare brush suit (coat and pants) on our ambulance. Its primarily there so that someone who shows up to a call in street clothes and doesn't have uniform apparal of their own can throw it on, but would also work as something to change into if needed.
 

emtbuff

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We carry a couple spare pairs of sweat pants in our rigs. Haven't seen to many people use them but they are there for those that would be working out side and need to change pants becuase they are covered in what ever. Or more so during the summer if you are wearing shorts and we have a car accident or feel the need to be wearing pants. Because by rights we are not suppose to wear shorts in the summer. But that all depends on the call. Simple transfers we can, but like mentioned before for a car accident you better be covered the best you can.
 

rescuecpt

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From Newsday: http://www.newsday.com/news/local/longisla...0,2697503.story

Police officer pulls fireman from icy hole
BY DERRICK HENRY
NEWSDAY.COM

February 25, 2005, 10:55 AM EST

A Suffolk police officer pulled a Commack firefighter from a large hole filled with icy water amid heavy snowfall early Friday, police said.

The icy fall happened after police checked out what appeared to be a broken water main at about 1:35 a.m. at 766 Larkfield Road. Officer Fred Leyboldt, who saw that water was flooding the residence, called the Commack Fire Department for assistance, police said.

When the firefighters arrived, they immediately began trying to move a parked car from a flooded driveway.

That's when the firefighter, Al Groveman, fell into a huge hole filled with icy water, police said. Police said Groveman was wearing full gear when he fell into the 10-foot-deep hole, which was concealed by water rushing from the broken main. Groveman was submerged up to his chin, police said. Groveman began grasping at the edge of the pavement to hold on but it began to collapse around him as the force from the rushing water pulled the firefighter deeper into the hole, police said.

Police said Leyboldt saw Groveman struggling and ran over, grabbed his wrist and pulled him to safety. Both men were treated to prevent hypothermia. The accident happened during heavy snowfall with a temperature of about 25 degrees.

The hole was about 10 feet deep, 15 feet long and 12 feet wide, police said.

Police said the car that firefighters were trying to move had knocked over a fire hydrant, which then broke the water main.
Also in video at News12.com: Suffolk Police Office Makes Daring Rescue of Firefighter in Commack

The truth is, the hole was only about 4 or 5 feet deep (Al is a good 6'2), he was in the hole only momentarily, the cop grabbed one arm, and a FF the other, and the "treatment for hypothermia" was a stiff drink at the firehouse. Hahaha... he is embarassed it got blown so out of proportion by the media. Al also rides at the ambulance corps and rides on my crew a lot filling in for his son who is medic school.

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Well everyone... I'm actually in Colorado this week for work (actually this week, next week, and the week after). For you locals, I'm heading to Purgatory today. The other person I am here with went up to Telluride for the weekend but I dont really want to give up my company sponsored (read, free) hotel room for a $200 room in Telluride. I'll let you know how it goes later.
 

coloradoemt

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Welcome to Colorado!!! :D I hope you enjoy your stay.
 

Jon

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Originally posted by rescuecpt@Feb 26 2005, 10:30 AM
From Newsday: 

Police officer pulls fireman from icy hole
BY DERRICK HENRY
NEWSDAY.COM


The truth is, the hole was only about 4 or 5 feet deep (Al is a good 6'2), he was in the hole only momentarily, the cop grabbed one arm, and a FF the other, and the "treatment for hypothermia" was a stiff drink at the firehouse. Hahaha... he is embarassed it got blown so out of proportion by the media. Al also rides at the ambulance corps and rides on my crew a lot filling in for his son who is medic school.
Still, never hurts to have friends like that arond to help you out when you goof up. (accidently or avoidably)


Anyway - Have fun in Colorodo, and try to avoid altitude sickness.


Jon
 
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