10-codes...

DonQ

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How many of these do you have to learn? I'm a rookie at this so go easy on me...:(
 

sunshine1026

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We only use one (10-50, MVA) so learning a bunch of them isn't an issue here. Luckily we use plain language, or else I'd really be confused! B)
 

kyleybug

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I'm not sure if the areas are different or not but we use them and ours goes as this:
1008-in service
1010- out of service
1045- MVA
1046-MVAw/injury- send ambulance
1018-returning to Co.
1017- back in Co.
1097- on scene
there are a whole bunch more but I don't have my list, see you can have a cheat sheet and all of our trucks have them, you won't be expectede to know them all at a drop of a hat. All of our hospitals in the area and nursing homes and DR.s offices have code #'s too but like I said there are so many we all just usually cheat from the list. The ones you use most frequently are the ones that you will remember.
 

ffemt8978

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We do everything in plain English around here. Evidently, our comm center doesn't want to learn 10 codes for police, fire, or EMS.
 

MMiz

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We use plain english, using the following system:

"On the Air" - Example: Bravo 1 is on the air with employees X and X
"Clear Responding" - Bravo 1 is clear responding
"Arrival" - Arrived at Location
"Copy" - Bravo 1 copies and is clear responding
"10-97" - When we arrive on scene where PD is also called, we use our PD radio and call "10-97"

I've used 10-4 a few times by accident. My partners made fun of me for a good ten minutes :)
 

dlkelleytn

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Speaking of 10 codes reminds me of the "good old days" before Central Dispatch when each agency handled their own dispatch. Our department had a new dispatcher who had been training for about a week and a half when the Chief sent a couple of guys up the "discreetly" question her on procedures, 10 codes, etc...

The guys not wanting to be accused of ambushing her, told her up front that they were there to ask her some general questions to see how she was grasping the duties of her new position. "Oh Lord", she said, "I never have been good at tests, so please go easy." The firemen assured her they would start slow - sooooooooooo

The first questions was: "What does 10-4 mean." The new dispatcher stood up yelling, "There you go trying to trick me right away by asking me hard questions!" after which she promptly grabbed her purse and left the fire hall never to be seen again!!!!!
 

SafetyPro2

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We don't use any 10 codes either. Informally we'll occaisonally use 10-8 for clearing a scene ("I'm 10-8.") and the ubiquitous 10-4, but even those are rare.

About the only non-plain English we use on the radio are the following:

Code 2 - no lights and sirens
Code 3 - lights and sirens
Code 4 - scene safe

Code 4 is usually used when we're dispatched to the scene of potential criminal activity, suicides, drug ODs, etc. Dispatch will, for example, say "RA41, assault victim, 123 Main Street, hold for PD Code 4." in which case we hold clear of the scene until PD indicates that the scene is under control. We also have a few residences where we've had previous problems where we've had dispatch add an automatic Code 4 request to any call at that address.
 

MMiz

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SafetyPro,

If you don't mind me asking, what are most calls dispatched as?

I notice many FDs dispatch many more calls "RLS" (Red Lights/Sirens) than private companies. Working in private EMS, upgrading to RLS is sometimes a chore if the dispatcher disagrees.
 

Chimpie

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I've used both and don't have a preference. It's funny when you work on one dept that uses them, and then you and a buddy are vollying at another dept that uses plain English, but you momentarily forget what dept you're working for and start using 10-codes. HAHA That was a fun day.

Chimp
 

SafetyPro2

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Originally posted by MMiz@Nov 15 2004, 01:33 AM
SafetyPro,

If you don't mind me asking, what are most calls dispatched as?

I notice many FDs dispatch many more calls "RLS" (Red Lights/Sirens) than private companies. Working in private EMS, upgrading to RLS is sometimes a chore if the dispatcher disagrees.
For EMS calls, we ALWAYS go Code 3 unless we're specifically dispatched as Code 2, which is rare and usually only happens if its a "frequent flyer" who know's its not life threatening or if its a still alarm called in by one of our people already on-scene. Even then, its usually a "Code 2 approach" which means the FF/EMT driving the ambulance has the leeway to go Code 3 to within a couple blocks and then cut the lights and siren on the final approach.

We're only SUPPOSED to transport Code 3 if specific life-threatening situations exist (arrest, severe dyspnea or hypoperfusion, uncontrolled hemhorraging, etc.), but the patient care EMT or medic can override that if they feel its in the patient's best interests. I'd say at least 90% of our transports are Code 2 though.

On non-EMS calls, its the Captain's call whether or not the apparatus goes Code 3. Basically, anything with any potential for life safety (fire, alarm, gas leak, TC, etc.) is a Code 3 response. We go Code 2 on things like water leaks, public assists (supplying a ladder or boarding up for PD) and other non-emergency calls.

Now, coincidentally, I was talking to my co-instructor from my Red Cross class the other night about this same issue. He works down in Orange County, and he said their protocol's a little different...their ambulances can only go Code 3 if specifically dispatched that way or if the FD personnel on-scene request it.
 

MMiz

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Interesting.

It's not uncommon around here for a rig to be dispatched "nothing special", request RLS based on PD radio traffic (we have PD radios, dispatch doesn't), and be denied.

I usually work as a first-response unit. Once on scene I can either upgrade or downgrade the other responding units. PD and FD can also upgrade and downgrade us.

Around here they absolutely don't want us using RLS unless the Pt can lose life or limb.

Personally I think RLS has a place in EMS, and feel as though our county's protocols are fair.

Okay, I wont get too far off subject on this one. I'm sure we had this conversation before.

In EMT school the instructor told us never to say the following in EMS:
1. "Over and out"
2. Roger
3. Walkie Talkie. It's a "Prep"
4. Resist all urges to say "Breaker 1-9"

And with that, I go back to working on my 20 page essay. Over and out :)
 

Chimpie

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I've never heard of an ambulance not going RLS, maybe except for going RL and S when needed. This is just bizarre.

Chimp
 

Margaritaville

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Chip, I agree

I am confused. When we are dispatched for an ambulance,we answer up in 30 to 45 seconds and respond within 2 minutes, we go lights and siren and arrive in a timely manner. We also have eliminated 10 codes, which I believe most will be eliminated at least in my state by 2007.

Enroute to the hospital, my partner and I use our own judgement as to lights and siren. In my state though, you must use both or none. No exceptions.

How can dispatchers who have not been with the patient in person dictate your response. That would cause me to become inflamed!!
 

MMiz

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Chimpie,

You're saying all calls go RLS? Let me give you some dispatches for "Normal" non RLS calls:

1. Pt possible overdose, no altered LOC
2. Pt with incision with minor controlled bleeding
3. Altered LOC suspected ETOH

I've only transported one RLS as a BLS unit. Working in private BLS, and having and ALS unit 2-5 minutes out, they almost always go BLS. If it comes down to it, the pt will go BLS, with a medic in the back, and a basic driving the rig.

95% of the time if it comes in via our 911 contract, it goes out as an RLS call. Not because they are any more emergent, but because people tend to feel their case is an emergency. Most calls out to nursing homes go out non RLS, the staff knowing the true state of the patient.

I envy you RLS folks. :)
 

colafdp

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10-4 - Message Received
10-7 - Arrived (at scene or hospital)
10-8 - Back in Service
10-11 - Phone Call Requested
10-12 - Unauthorized Listener
10-16 - Enroute To
10-7-55 - Back at base
Code 9's - RCMP
Code 11's - Fire Dept.

Like for example

"We're 10-8, 10-16, XXXXXX Hospital Code 2 with 1"

And for RLS or not.

Calls fall under following categories

Code 1 - Booked Transport
Code 2 - Not life threatening (Broken Arm, ETOH, etc.)
Code 4 - Serious or Life threatening (MVC's, CP, SOB, etc.)
 

Chimpie

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Originally posted by MMiz@Nov 20 2004, 01:40 AM
Chimpie,

You're saying all calls go RLS?
Let me make sure that we are on the same lines here. And remember, while I've never worked on an ambulance, I have been on plenty of EMS runs and know some people in the ambulance service. With that....

Besides transfers, I think/thought every ambulance run starts out RLS. Now whether they are transported RLS to the hospital is of coursed based on the pt's condition. I have seen where the ambulance starts out RLS but once someone gets on scene they might slow down to RL and S when needed.

But take your example of pt with incision with minor, controllable bleading. How do you know what is minor? I can't tell you any number of calls I've been on where it comes in as a minor cut and we get there and he has a two inch gash requiring stiches.

I'd never want to be the crew that gets there when we get there only to find out that the pt needed us there yesterday.

Chimp
 

rescuecpt

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My FD responds to all ambulance calls RLS. Dispatch isn't always that reliable (we don't dispatch for ourselves, either 911 or a dispatcher in the next town does it), and we have no traffic lights/through traffic/etc in our district, so the risk is minimal compared to other locations.

At the ambulance corps, we use the EMD system, and that dictates RLS or no. Alphas are none, Bravos are lights/limited sirens, Charlie-Delta-Echo are RLS.

I'd rather get there a little faster (but safely, of course), because "abdominal pain" could really be a GI bleed where every second counts. Or it could be gas. But you never know until you see it with your own eyes.
 
OP
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DonQ

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Originally posted by Chimpie@Nov 20 2004, 06:44 AM
Let me make sure that we are on the same lines here. And remember, while I've never worked on an ambulance, I have been on plenty of EMS runs and know some people in the ambulance service. With that....

Besides transfers, I think/thought every ambulance run starts out RLS. Now whether they are transported RLS to the hospital is of coursed based on the pt's condition. I have seen where the ambulance starts out RLS but once someone gets on scene they might slow down to RL and S when needed.

But take your example of pt with incision with minor, controllable bleading. How do you know what is minor? I can't tell you any number of calls I've been on where it comes in as a minor cut and we get there and he has a two inch gash requiring stiches.

I'd never want to be the crew that gets there when we get there only to find out that the pt needed us there yesterday.

Chimp
I agree
 

PArescueEMT

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I am going thru the conversion of 10-codes to plain speak now.

10-76= en route
10-23= on scene
10-24= at destination
10-8=clear


The RLS thing, we use the class system:

Class 1 - Life Threatening - RLS
Class 2 - Critical non life threatening- RL, S when needed (DOT don't like this one. they say all or none)
Class 3 - Glorified taxi - Non-RLS
Class 4 - Psych - Optional RLS - YOUR CALL
Class 5 - DOA No transport

If you have the letter "X" after any (i.e. Class 2X) that means the patient is being combative

You WILL gat funny looks if you call in a Class 5X. I saw someone do that while still in school.
It was sad the amount of ridicule they took.
 

SafetyPro2

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Originally posted by Chimpie@Nov 20 2004, 04:44 AM
But take your example of pt with incision with minor, controllable bleading. How do you know what is minor? I can't tell you any number of calls I've been on where it comes in as a minor cut and we get there and he has a two inch gash requiring stiches.
I have to agree on this. I've been toned out on several calls that sounded minor and turned out to be very serious on arrival. Good example was that wilderness call I've mentioned that was toned out as a minor fall with a leg laceration that was a 50 foot fall with an compound fracture and ended up being an airlift. I've also had difficulty breathing calls turn out to be full arrests.

Of course, there are also plenty of serious-sounding calls that turn out to be nothing, but I'd rather err on the side of caution.
 

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