“Silent Approach Requested…”

Do You Comply With the Request For a Silent Approach?


  • Total voters
    53

Mountain Res-Q

Forum Deputy Chief
1,757
0
0
Don’t know if this is an issue in your area, but it seems that a good portion of EMS Dispatches in my area are ended with the words, “Silent Approach Requested.” So, two questions for ya…

1. Do you comply with that request from the RP?
2. Why do you think they request no siren?
 

Seaglass

Lesser Ambulance Ape
973
0
0
It's not a common request here. Whether we'd comply depends on the call, location, and time of day. We usually approach lights-only once we're in a quieter neighborhood anyways, especially at night.

As for why it would be requested... privacy can be one. In some areas, a lot of bystanders will congregate to watch what's going on. I remember another crew on my shift getting that request for a family where a teenager was having a miscarriage. I can see why they'd want to avoid having nosy neighbors ask about that one, although I can't really see why they wouldn't just make something else up. As I recall, the crew did approach without l/s. Sometimes sirens will also scare small kids, so I could see parents wanting to avoid that.

Edit: I forgot about being requested to stage off-scene by law enforcement. In that case, you can bet we're going to turn off the l/s as we get close, even though we'll be staging somewhere safe.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

mycrofft

Still crazy but elsewhere
11,322
45
48
Used to.

"Code two" is a myth. Ask your insurer.


........BOO!
 

PapaBear434

Forum Asst. Chief
619
0
0
Depends on the call. If they request a silent approach, but they are having difficulty breathing... Well, I'm gonna go l/s anyway. I'll just kill it when we get into the neighborhood.

But if it's Priority 2, depending on what the comments say, I may or may not just get there when I get there. I'll usually turn on the Opticom, to not waste too much time, but I don't go l/s because someone twisted an ankle playing touch football.
 

medicdan

Forum Deputy Chief
Premium Member
2,491
14
38
Mirroring others, it depends on what the story is. Is this silent so we dont attract the nosy neighbors? Because we are on an emergency standby (waiting for PD to go in)? Patient doesnt want to wake sleeping husband? What is the dispatch complaint? How far am I from the scene? What level of care am I?
 

MSDeltaFlt

RRT/NRP
1,422
35
48
There weren't enough options. It depends on how you're dispatched (Priority 1, 2, 3, etc), location of the call, type of call, it just depends.
 

fma08

Forum Asst. Chief
833
2
18
"Code two" is a myth. Ask your insurer.


........BOO!

I agree, there are only two modes of response in reality. Emergent (lights and sirens) or non-emergent (no lights and sirens)
 

daedalus

Forum Deputy Chief
1,784
1
0
If someone calls 911 and asks for the siren not to be used, then its not really an emergency in the first place and 911 should not have been called.

I do not honor these requests.

**Thats not to say that I do not believe that paramedics should only handle emergencies. However, the 911 system is currently set up for emergencies only. If the call warrants a code 3 response by our dispatch center, and the reporting party requests a no-code response, it is ignored**
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Akulahawk

EMT-P/ED RN
Community Leader
4,675
1,076
113
It really depends upon the requesting party. If the requesting party is Law Enforcement, I'll honor that request. The reason is that if they're asking for a silent approach, it is because they have a specific tactical need... for them to not be located easily, or to unnecessarily alarm a suspect. When they request it, I'll shut the siren down about a mile out, and then the lights off (and possibly go blackout) between 1/4 and 1/2 mile out, depending upon the specific situation, and stage at the location requested.

With private parties requesting a silent approach, I normally won't abide by that request.
 

firecoins

IFT Puppet
3,880
17
38
I don't abide by that request unless I know more info like the situation is non-emergent.
 

Ridryder911

EMS Guru
5,922
38
48
There are actual communities that have prohibitive codes that does not allow EMS or any emergency unit to respond with l & S after 2100, and yes they have fined EMS agencies for not abiding.

In real terms, it all depends. If it is 0300 and there is NO one in the community why awaken the neighbors and seriously what time do you really save anyway? I much rather drive up without any on.

R/r 911
 

PapaBear434

Forum Asst. Chief
619
0
0
There are actual communities that have prohibitive codes that does not allow EMS or any emergency unit to respond with l & S after 2100, and yes they have fined EMS agencies for not abiding.

In real terms, it all depends. If it is 0300 and there is NO one in the community why awaken the neighbors and seriously what time do you really save anyway? I much rather drive up without any on.

R/r 911

On the night shifts, we usually kill the sirens as soon as we get off the main road and hit the neighborhood, even if it's an emergent case. If it's a fairly benign call (ie: not an arrest) we'll usually kill the lights too.

But it also depends. If we are first on scene, we'll keep our lights on so it makes it easier for secondary units (additional ALS backup) to find the house so you don't waste time reading addresses.

But, by and large, the siren gets cut as soon as we are in near the houses. State law says if lights are on, your sirens are supposed to be too, but there is certain leeway at night and going 25 mph.
 

Tincanfireman

Airfield Operations
1,054
1
0
Usually, the only reason we get requested to go in quiet is for a psych case where the PD is already on scene; getting a DP all wound up just ends up causing me more work to get them calmed down again. If it's a 3 a.m. call to BFE, I'll use the siren selectively as traffic dictates, but we leave the lights on in the event we need help. Some of our residences are up to 1/4 mile off the road, and some of the locals are kind of casual about addresses, so leaving the lights going is a good idea.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Hal9000

Forum Captain
405
3
18
Yes, I sometimes follow the request, and see RR's comment as my response is similar to his.
 

firecoins

IFT Puppet
3,880
17
38
There are actual communities that have prohibitive codes that does not allow EMS or any emergency unit to respond with l & S after 2100, and yes they have fined EMS agencies for not abiding.

In real terms, it all depends. If it is 0300 and there is NO one in the community why awaken the neighbors and seriously what time do you really save anyway? I much rather drive up without any on.

R/r 911

at 3am there may not be any traffic to use a siren on anyway.
 

PapaBear434

Forum Asst. Chief
619
0
0
Oh, that's another couple I forgot. Psych cases, as Tincanfireman mentioned, and seizure cases, especially at night. The last thing you need for a epileptic patient is flashing lights and loud noises.
 

daedalus

Forum Deputy Chief
1,784
1
0
Oh, that's another couple I forgot. Psych cases, as Tincanfireman mentioned, and seizure cases, especially at night. The last thing you need for a epileptic patient is flashing lights and loud noises.

can you provide any evidence of emergency vehicle induced seizure?
 

exodus

Forum Deputy Chief
2,895
242
63
I kill siren's whenever there is no-traffic. But lights are staying on. If PD says turn off... They go off, they got a gun.
 

PapaBear434

Forum Asst. Chief
619
0
0
can you provide any evidence of emergency vehicle induced seizure?

Can't say I can. But it's protocol for us to kill our lights for seizure cases, because there is plenty of evidence of flashing lights and causing seizures in some people.

Seems it's better to be safe than sorry. And it's not like it inconveniences me. Once I get to the scene, I see no reason not to turn off the strobes to just be on the safe side.
 

Dominion

Forum Asst. Chief
607
0
0
In the past when entering a residential area from a main road I turn off the siren. If it's late at night and no cars are out I use the siren only when approaching intersections. If entering a residential neighborhood with traffic during the day, l&s.
 

Top