NREMT Paramedic Oral Station scenario

Discussion in 'NREMT' started by arharris83, Nov 28, 2011.

  1. arharris83

    arharris83 Member

    Location:
    Lincoln Ne
    EMS Training:
    EMT-Paramedic
    Do they use the one you see on the national registry website as the first one then use a random on the second? If not what was your Oral Station scenario?
  2. STXmedic

    STXmedic Forum Alchemist Premium Member

    Location:
    Texas
    EMS Training:
    EMT-Paramedic
    No. There are quite a few.
  3. mycrofft

    mycrofft Still crazy but elsewhere

    Location:
    Central California
    When, when, when...

    ...when will the health profession and the legal profession learn the difference between "oral" and "verbal"?

    Or were we looking into mouths? If so, comment retracted.:cool:
  4. fast65

    fast65 Doogie Howser EMTP

    Location:
    Oregon
    No, as PJ said, there are quite a few different scenarios they can pick from, the best bet is to be prepared for all of the possibilities like you're supposed to be. Both of my scenarios had to do with some sort of disease process, that's as specific as I'll be.
  5. arharris83

    arharris83 Member

    Location:
    Lincoln Ne
    EMS Training:
    EMT-Paramedic
    Well got'er done today but I have to retest on Static Cardiology and I am not sure why I failed either, I felt very strongly about both. For my Oral Stations I had CVA and Hypothermia patients, nailed both. Just wish I knew what I messed up on in Static Cardiology. BTW I have ZERO Experience as an EMT-B, I am sure you were "Ready for ALL possibilities" as a New Paramedic with Zero experience even as a Basic right? I wish I was as good as EVERYONE on here seems to be at being a soon to be NEW Paramedic! I see everyone here seems to have their MD (it seems like it anyways).
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 30, 2011
  6. Medic Tim

    Medic Tim Active Member Premium Member

    Location:
    Canada
    how was you time. In my class a few failed static due to going over the 4 min
  7. arharris83

    arharris83 Member

    Location:
    Lincoln Ne
    EMS Training:
    EMT-Paramedic
    National Registry gives you 6 minutes for 4 strips. I didn't think I went over time, I don't think I have been over time since like the first few times I ever did static but that is possible. During my redo I swear I had a 2nd Degree type 1 because the PRI Got longer and longer until it dropped a QRS and he marked it wrong, but there was nothing I could do about it.
  8. Medic Tim

    Medic Tim Active Member Premium Member

    Location:
    Canada
    my bad, in trainied we had a 4 min time limit
  9. MICP

    MICP New Member

    Static Cardiology

    For the static cardiology you must get the rhythm correct in order to get credit for the treatment. It is possible that you called the wrong rhythm. Let's say you called it a sinus brady first degree block when it was just sinus brady. In this case, even though you did the vitals, O2, monitor (12-lead), IV, atropine, pacing, dopamine and then epi if needed, none of this would count since you had the wrong rhythm.

    I have been conducting NREMT-P exams for 10 years and this is usually the cause of failures on the static cardiology, besides running out of time.
  10. arharris83

    arharris83 Member

    Location:
    Lincoln Ne
    EMS Training:
    EMT-Paramedic
    I am pretty sure that a Second Degree type 1 aka Weinkeback is where the PRI gets longer and longer until a QRS is dropped, right? Well that's one of the strips I had and I know I said Second Degree type 1 and gave the correct treatments for it and he gave me a zero for it. But by the time I realized it it was to late to say anything about it, but oh well I will get it next time when I retest in January in Des Moines Iowa.
  11. STXmedic

    STXmedic Forum Alchemist Premium Member

    Location:
    Texas
    EMS Training:
    EMT-Paramedic
    Somebody sounds like a hater :) I was a new paramedic with no experience and walked through the practicals without a sweat, as I'm sure many here did. They are by no means difficult. They test you on knowing the basics of the job that you will very soon be doing. It is by no means extremely tricky scenarios with zebras thrown at you, causing you to go through several DDXs. That will come with experience. The joke that is NR tests you on the basics that a NEW paramedic with ZERO experience should be more than capable of handling.
  12. fast65

    fast65 Doogie Howser EMTP

    Location:
    Oregon
    I actually was relatively prepared for all possibilities, because it's my job to be prepared for all of them. Will I be able to narrow down the problem every time? Probably not, but I'll be ready to manage them to the best of my ability. I don't get the option of asking dispatch "what kinds of calls do you think I'll get today?", when I walk in in the morning, and that's how I viewed it at practicals.

    Like PJ, I also walked through practicals without a problem. NR is only there to test you on the very basics of being an EMT or paramedic, it's not tricky, the scenarios are usually pretty straightforward.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 2, 2011
  13. arharris83

    arharris83 Member

    Location:
    Lincoln Ne
    EMS Training:
    EMT-Paramedic
    The funny thing is that not every site that does the NR have a set standard even though it's supposed to be. Especially now that they added a Failure Criteria to the bottom of every page that says "Failed to treat the patient as a competent EMT" that can be construed in any form by any preceptor which to me isn't a National Standard. I am by no means perfect and neither are any of you. I am discouraged by some of the people on here because they think they have to show off how much they know like its a who has the bigger ego to fill competition. I am not looking for exact answers to my questions but a little insight to make me think and I am not trying to see who has the biggest ego either. We are supposed to be on the same team and not try to make people that has less experience look like garbage. I had no problem with any stations as an EMT-B NR test. I can manage a Patient as a competent EMT that's not my problem. I feel as if I am ready for all possibilities I have seen a lot out in the field just doing ride a longs and clinicals. I have read my books I have studied them even after I read them and went through them in class. I am not book smart but I happened to have the highest grade in my class. I worked my butt off to get to where I am now, I worked 2 days a week and worked on my class 7 days a week for the past year. I am not incompetent I just have some flaws that anyone of you could have had as a new medic. Anyways thanks for your replies to my post. I have learned a lot about being a medic from this forum, I will continue to learn a lot and do my best to be the best medic I CAN BE and try not to make new medics feel belittled either here or in the field. We are on the same team we all want the same out of this profession which is the best outcome for the Patient I am responsible for!
  14. SeeNoMore

    SeeNoMore New Member

    EMS Training:
    Critical Care Paramedic
    I actually test sat. I just want to point out that while I do agree that NR is something you should be very prepared for, I also know very competent and intelligent paramedics who had to take a section over. Practical testing makes me very nervous, and while I hope I pass the first time I can see messing something up that I might not in the field. Somehow the stress is different.
  15. Chief Complaint

    Chief Complaint New Member

    Agreed. Retesting stations is pretty common and no reason to get bummed out. I know plenty of smart people, including myself, who had to retest a couple of stations. Some people just get nervous. More importantly, if you happen to draw a particularly tough examiner, you have a higher chance of failing.

    Many NR testers are lenient, but there are always a couple who are out to ruin somebody's day.
  16. Akulahawk

    Akulahawk EMpTy eaRNer

    Location:
    Unincorporated Sacramento County
    EMS Training:
    EMT-Paramedic
    Part of the reason why some people have to retest is that sometimes people can have a difficulty "seeing" the scenario patient. It also forces you to verbalize an assessment sequence that, while somewhat logical, is not quite like anything done in the "real" world. Just this alone can mess with your mind enough that you get out of sequence for what the NR wants and suddenly, you find yourself failing a station because of it.

    The testing itself isn't hard, but you do have to get through it as it's at least an attempt to show that you can perform at the level of a beginning Paramedic. This is a level that all Paramedics should be able to perform at, regardless of length of time as a Paramedic.
  17. SeeNoMore

    SeeNoMore New Member

    EMS Training:
    Critical Care Paramedic
    Luckily I passed all my stations first go around. My advice for orals after having actually taken them is probably the same as most people, ask a lot of questions. But also remember it is supposed to mimic a real life situation, so don't hesitate to intervene when necessary. I am not sure if this is supposed to be allowed, but I made it clear when some actions would happen at the same time. For example, if I have a partner I can be attending to a patient while he/she is asking questions.
  18. keith00200

    keith00200 New Member

    Location:
    Natick, MA
    EMS Training:
    EMT-Paramedic
    Without going into too much detail, my first oral was a medical (respiratory) and my second was a pedi trauma. The oral stations can be intimidating but if you know your stuff you'll do fine.

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