Basic VS. Intermediate?

Discussion in 'Education and Training' started by Nick647, Nov 19, 2009.

  1. Nick647

    Nick647 New Member

    Location:
    Massachusetts
    Obviously I plan to start as an EMT-B cause I dont have much of a choice but what exactly is the difference between of Basic and Intermediate Levels (I know there are two)? Can the EMT-I administer more medicine and what not then the Basic? I know that Medic is the most advanced but what is the difference between EMT-B and EMT-I and the two levels of Intermediate?

    Thanks.
  2. EMSLaw

    EMSLaw Legal Beagle

    Location:
    New Jersey
    The answer will vary depending on your state. There are people on the forum from Mass, so they have better ideas than me.

    Basically, though, EMT-Is can usually use more advanced airway adjuncts, such as dual lumen airways, can start unmedicated IV lines and run normal saline and D5W, and may have access to a limited number of medications, such as Narcan and Glucagon.

    I'm neither an EMT-I nor a medic, but most of the threads around here seem to say that the EMT-I level is a waste, based around adding a few additional skills without sufficient didactic education, and that if you are interested in more advanced knowledge and techniques, you should just become a Paramedic.
  3. Linuss

    Linuss New Member

    Location:
    DFW
    There are 2 levels of Intermediate (1985 and 1999) and each has a different skill-set. What they can do ends up being based on what level you are AND what state you're in.


    In general, I's can start IVs, do some advanced airways, give a little bit more drugs, read a 3-lead EKG, and manually defib.
  4. medicdan

    medicdan Active Member Premium Member

    Location:
    Northeast
    Take a look at http://www.emtlife.com/showthread.php?t=5395
    EMT-I training is entirely useless in metro Boston, where the certification is not accepted. Even in parts of MA that accept EMT-Is, the scope should not be confused with that of a Paramedic, and you should not confuse lines and tubes with a full ALS scope.
  5. allvitals09

    allvitals09 New Member

    Location:
    Somerset MA
    In mass

    EMT-I can place IV and ET tubes, but the are limited to the same drugs a basic is. Whether or not they can read EKGs I don't remember or for manual defib either. Currently Intermediates are being phased out.
  6. Nick647

    Nick647 New Member

    Location:
    Massachusetts
    Yeah thats what I figured. They can use a little more medicine then Basics but not much. I think what ill wind up doing is doing EMT-B for a bit and then go straight to my Medic. That way I wont waste any time.
  7. allvitals09

    allvitals09 New Member

    Location:
    Somerset MA
    I have about a month left in my basic class before all of the testing, but I am almost positive that I want to continue on to medic. Before going for medic I am definitely going to wait 6 months to a year to be able to get a handle on some actual field time though.
  8. go straight to medic, it's not that hard
  9. Seaglass

    Seaglass Lesser Ambulance Ape

    Location:
    USA
    EMS Training:
    EMT-Basic
    That, pretty much. The only exception is if you find yourself in an area which requires intermediate before medic, or in one where medics are so restricted or intermediates so free that there's virtually no difference between the levels. Those are rare, and you'll catch on pretty quick if you ever find yourself there.
  10. allvitals09

    allvitals09 New Member

    Location:
    Somerset MA
    I am not worried about the difficulty of the medic program I just want some field time first. In the majority of people that I have talked to being out in the field has helped them tremendously before continuing on to higher levels.

    http://emtlife.com/showthread.php?t=15562
  11. Nick647

    Nick647 New Member

    Location:
    Massachusetts
    Well the problem is the fact in MA they dont let you go straight to it. Its just reccomended to go and get your EMT-B first and do some training and then get your medic. The community college in Maine I am looking at (im from Mass.), states that if you want to be apart of the paramedic program, you have to be an EMT-B for six months, and have atleast 50 calls with Ambulance Company or Fire Dept. Documented to participate.
  12. vquintessence

    vquintessence New Member

    Location:
    America
    MA only requires something like 100 hrs of ambulance time as an EMT before you can become a paramedic. I've seen that requirement waived time and time again. Also, it's not even a pre-requisite prior to starting a medic program.

    Is paying out-of-state tuition rates in ME that much cheaper than in-state tuition rates of MA? I assume you live in the Merrimack valley/North Shore area? What schools are you looking into for medic programs?

    Unless you plan on working in ME exclusively, why not get your EMT-B in MA; work full-time for a couple months (3 max) then start up a medic program. The beauty of EMS is that you can continue to work while in school because of the joy of 16 or 24 hr shifts.

    At the end of your program (Typically 12 months), you'll have plenty of "BLS experience" along with familiarity of the daily operations of an ambulance service.
  13. Nick647

    Nick647 New Member

    Location:
    Massachusetts

    Im thinking of taking my classes at Center For Medics in Cambridge. Another place I am looking at Southern Maine Community College and they have an EMT Program there. I would like to participate in the Paramedic program but it requires that you have your EMT-B for Six months and you have Documented 50 Calls you have responded to. Theres also a fire science program there I'm also looking at. Another thing is that I have been told you are more likely to get hired with a Degree instead of just a certificate.
  14. vquintessence

    vquintessence New Member

    Location:
    America
    IMHO, a degree certainly looks better during an interview, but I wouldn't count it as the ultimate trump card over other candidates. HOWEVER, possessing a college accredited degree is much more valuable in the broad spectrum of things (aka life) than a specialized certificate.

    The Center for Medics program is a very good one as far as certificate programs are concerned. I know the primary instructor; he is very experienced and pragmatic with his education. Many of the green medics who have come out of there (recent and past) typically perform well beyond the monkey with tools mentality.

    Tough choices for you... perhaps the Community College in ME would suite you best initially... you can get college credit for your EMT class and apply that toward an AD in Fire Science.
  15. Nick647

    Nick647 New Member

    Location:
    Massachusetts
    Yeah plus on a personal level, Im sure id be happier if I went to school as well. Even be it for two years. I would also come out as a well rounded person (like someone else here had said) and it could help in the EMS field. It wouldnt be a bad thing.

    I think one of my main concerns is that though I get the classes done, would I still be able to be certified in Boston or somewhere in MA? Im sure just because I took a class at CC wouldnt be a draw back from getting certified in MA either.

    PS-I hate to sound like a moron but what does AD mean? Sorry...
  16. Linuss

    Linuss New Member

    Location:
    DFW
    Associates Degree

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